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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

leucorrhea. A general rundown condition, worry, overwork, too hard 

study, lack of fresh air, and a general scrofulous condition also 

favor the development of catarrh of the womb and leucorrhea. It will 

therefore be seen that the treatment of leucorrhea to be successful 

must be general and local. 

 

=General Treatment.= The general treatment consists in general 

hygienic measures and in common sense. The patient should not be on 

her feet more than she can help, and she should not walk until 

exhausted or fatigued. It is better to take several short walks than 

one long one. The corset she wears, if she wears any at all, should be 

of the modern kind: not one that presses the womb and the other 

abdominal organs down, but one that supports the abdominal walls, and 

rather raises the abdominal organs up. The lacing or buttoning must be 

from below up, and not from above down. That it should not in any way 

interfere with the freedom of respiration goes without saying. 

Constipation if any, to be treated, must be treated intelligently, by 

mild measures (see Constipation, in the chapter on pregnancy), and 

care must be taken that the bowels move at regular hours. Where the 

leucorrhea is due to or is aggravated by anemia and general weakness, 

a good iron preparation, such as one Blaud's five-grain pill three 

times a day, or a tonic of iron, quinine and strychnine, will do good. 

A daily cold bath or cold sponge, followed by a brisk dry rubbing with 

a rough towel, is also useful. 

 

=Local Treatment.= Local measures consist of painting or swabbing the 

vagina and cervix with various solutions, of tampons, suppositories 

and douches. Local application to the vagina and uterus can be done 

satisfactorily by the physician or nurse only. The insertion of a 

suppository or douching can be easily done by the patient herself. 

 

While it is always best and safest to consult a physician, and, while 

self-medication is generally inadvisable, there are occasions when a 

physician is not available; in some small places a woman may, _for 

various reasons_, have a strong objection to gynecological examination 

and treatment; and some women may be too poor to pay the doctor. In 

such circumstances self-treatment is justified and there can be no 

objection to it if the remedies are harmless and are sure to do some 

good; that is, to improve the condition where they do not effect a 

complete cure. 

 

One of the simplest things is an alum tampon. You take a piece of 

absorbent cotton, about the size of a fist, spread it out, put about a 

tablespoonful of powdered alum on it, fold it up, tie a string around 

the center, insert it in the vagina as far as it will go, and leave it 

in for twenty-four hours. Then pull it gently by the string and 


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