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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

CHAPTER TWENTY-THREE 

 

GONORRHEA 

 

Source of Gonorrhea--Mucous Membrane of Genital Organs and of Eye 

Principal Seats of Disease--Symptoms in Men and in Women--Vagina 

Seldom Attacked in Adults--Nobody Inherits Gonorrhea--Ophthalmia 

Neonatorum--Differences of Course of Disease in Men and Women-- 

Gonorrhea Less Painful in Women--Symptoms not Suspected by Woman-- 

Necessity for the Woman Consulting a Physician--Self-treatment 

When Woman Cannot Consult Physician--Formulae for Injections. 

 

 

The subject of gonorrhea and syphilis is treated pretty fully, from a 

layman's point of view, in the author's _Sex Knowledge for Men_. I do 

not intend to devote much space to a discussion of the details of 

these two diseases here, because the subject is not of such direct 

interest to women. Respectable girls and women do not indulge in 

illicit relations the same as respectable men and boys do, and their 

danger of contracting a venereal disease is insignificant as compared 

with men's liability. I will, therefore, touch upon only a few points, 

particularly insofar as the diseases differ in their course from the 

course pursued in men. Those, however, who are interested may read the 

chapters on the subject in the author's _Sex Knowledge for Men_, and 

if they want still fuller details, they may study the author's 

_Treatment of Gonorrhea and Its Complications in Men and Women_. 

 

[Illustration: GONORRHEAL GERMS.] 

 

=Gonorrhea= is an inflammation caused by a germ called the gonococcus, 

discovered by Dr. A. Neisser, of Breslau, Germany, in 1879. Any mucous 

membrane may be the seat of gonorrhea, but it attacks by preference 

the mucous membrane of the genital organs, and of one other organ--the 

eye. Its principal symptoms are: inflammation, pain, burning and 

discharge. In men, it attacks the urethra; in women it attacks the 

cervix--the neck of the womb--the urethra, and the vulva. The vagina 

is seldom attacked in adult women, because the mucous membrane of the 

adult vagina is rather tough and does not offer a good soil for the 

development of the gonococcus germ. The discharge that a woman has 

when she has gonorrhea comes principally or exclusively from the neck 

of the womb. In little girls, however, in whom the lining of the 

vagina is tender, gonorrhea of the vagina and the vulva is common. 

(See chapter Vulvovaginitis in Little Girls.) Gonorrhea is a local 

disease. While in some cases, after the disease has lasted for some 

time, a certain poison is generated by the germs which circulates in 

the blood, and while the germs may occasionally wander into distant 

organs, still in 98 per cent. of all cases gonorrhea is a local 

disease, and if taken in time is cured without leaving any traces on 

the general organism. 

 

=Gonorrhea Not Hereditary.= Then, gonorrhea is not a hereditary 


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