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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

hospitals. The very dangerous infective character of vulvovaginitis 

was not known, and the infection was therefore easily transferred by 

towels, linen, toilet seats, bedpans, syringe nozzles, thermometers, 

the nurses' hands, and in various other ways. Now great care is being 

taken and in most hospitals no children are admitted in the general 

wards unless it is determined that they are free from vulvovaginitis. 

 

Generally speaking, vulvovaginitis in children is a mild infection. A 

child may have it for several weeks or months without being aware of 

it, without saying anything about it, the diagnosis often being made 

by the mother, who begins to notice the creamy discharge on the girl's 

linen or underwear. And this is the principal symptom in little girls 

thus afflicted--the discharge. This discharge may be very profuse, 

covering the vulva, vagina, and cervix. 

 

In severe cases, there is also an infection of the urethra, and the 

child may complain of burning at urination, itching and pain around 

the vulva and anus, and slight pain in the abdomen. There may be a 

moderate rise in temperature, up to 101 deg. F., and in some instances 

the attack is sufficiently acute to give rise to a chill and fever. A 

mild inflammation of the joints may set in within the first weeks of 

the infection, although as a usual thing it comes later on. 

 

=Evil Sequelae of Vulvovaginitis.= While, as stated, vulvovaginitis is 

a comparatively mild infection as far as its symptoms are concerned, 

it nevertheless has a very bad effect on the child who is unfortunate 

enough to become a victim of the disease. First of all, it is an 

extremely long drawn, persistent disease. It usually takes months, and 

these months may run into years, before a complete cure, is effected. 

Second, relapses are quite common. Third, the treatment is a 

disagreeable one for the child, and is occasionally painful. Fourth, 

it has a disastrous effect on the child's _morale_; most parents, 

though they may love the child most affectionately, look somewhat 

askance at it; and continuous vaginal treatment somehow or other has a 

humiliating effect on the child, which begins to consider itself as an 

outcast, as something apart from other children. Fifth, the child's 

education is very frequently seriously and permanently interfered 

with, because it must often be taken out of school, whether public or 

private, and private tutoring is of course feasible only for the few. 

Sixth, and this is a point not sufficiently appreciated by the 

profession and the laity, but it is an important point, nevertheless: 

vulvovaginitis in children has unfortunately a disastrous effect in 

_hastening the sexual maturity of the child_. Whether this is due to 

the congestion of the organs produced by the inflammation, or to the 


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