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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

massage, and from the seminal vesicles, as obtained by "milking," or 

"stripping," the vesicles, must be free from pus and gonococci. To 

make sure, it is best to repeat such examination at three different 

times. 

 

4. There must be neither stricture nor patches in the urethra. 

 

5. What we call the complement-fixation test, which is a blood test 

for gonorrhea similar to the Wassermann blood-test for syphilis, must 

be negative. 

 

Referring to conditions 1 and 2, it sometimes happens that the patient 

has a minute amount of discharge or a few shreds in the urine, and I 

still permit him to marry; but this is done only after the discharge 

and shreds have been repeatedly examined and have been found to be 

catarrhal in character and absolutely free from any gonococci or other 

germs. 

 

It sometimes happens that a patient comes to me for an examination a 

few days before the date set for the wedding. I examine him and find 

that he is not in a safe condition to marry, and so advise him to 

delay the wedding. Sometimes he follows the advice, but in some cases 

he is unable to do so. He claims the wedding has been arranged, the 

invitation-cards have been sent out, and to delay the wedding would 

lead to endless trouble and perhaps scandal. In such cases I, of 

course, assume no responsibility; however, I do advise the man to use 

an antiseptic suppository or some other method that will protect the 

bride from infection for the time being, while he, the husband, has an 

opportunity to take treatment until cured. Of the many cases in which 

I advised this method, I do not know of one in which infection has 

taken place. 

 

=When May a Woman Who Once Had Gonorrhea Be Permitted to Marry?= In 

the case of a woman, the decision may be harder to reach than in that 

of a man. Of course, the urine must be clear and the urethra must be 

normal; however, we cannot insist that there must be no discharge. 

This, because practically every woman has some slight discharge; even, 

if not all the time, then at least immediately prior and subsequent to 

menstruation. Of course, the discharge must be free from gonococci and 

pus. Also the complement-fixation tests must be negative. But, even 

so, we cannot be absolutely sure, because gonococci may be hidden in 

the uterus or in the Fallopian tubes. 

 

Here, we have to go a good deal by the history given us. If the woman, 

during the course of the gonorrhea, had salpingitis, that is, an 

inflammation of the Fallopian tubes, then we can never say positively 

that she is cured; all we can say, at best, is: presumably cured. And, 

further, if she has no pains in the uterine appendages, either 

spontaneous or on examination, and, if several examinations made 

within a day or two following menstruation are negative, then we may 


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