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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

assume that she is cured. It is important, though, that this 

examination be made on the last day of menstruation or on the first or 

second day following; for there are many cases in which no pus and no 

gonococci will show in the inter-menstrual period, but will appear on 

those particular days, because, if the gonococci are hidden high up, 

they are likely to come down with the menstrual blood and portions of 

mucous membrane that are shed during menstruation. 

 

At best, it is a delicate problem, so that whenever there has been the 

least suspicion that the woman may harbor gonococci I have always 

advised (as is my custom, to be on the safe side) and directed the 

woman to use either an antiseptic suppository or an antiseptic douche 

before coitus. With these precautions adopted, I have never had an 

accident happen. 

 

=The Question of Probable Sterility.= Thus far I have considered the 

problem of marriage from the standpoint of infectivity. But, we know 

that, besides the effect on the individual, gonorrhea has also a 

far-reaching influence on the race; in other words, that it is prone 

to make the subjects--both men and women--sterile. And a candidate for 

marriage may, and often does, want to know whether, besides being 

noninfective, he or she is capable of begetting or having children. 

 

In the case of man, the problem is, fortunately, a very simple one. We 

can easily obtain a specimen of the man's semen and determine, by 

means of the microscope, whether it contains spermatozoa or not. If it 

does contain a normal number of lively, rapidly moving spermatozoa, 

the man is fertile, regardless of whether he ever had epididymitis or 

not. If the semen contains no spermatozoa, or only a few deformed or 

lazily moving ones, then he is sterile. 

 

In the case of woman, it is _absolutely_ impossible to determine 

whether the gonorrhea has made her sterile or not; because there is no 

way of expressing an ovum from the ovary. The woman may not have had 

any pain or inflammation in the Fallopian tubes, and yet there may 

have been sufficient inflammation to close up the orifices of the 

tubes. On the other hand, she may have had a severe salpingitis on 

_both sides and still be fertile_. Nor is there any way of telling 

whether the ovaries were so involved in the process as to become 

incapable of generating healthy ova, or any ova at all. In short, 

there is absolutely no way of telling whether a woman is sterile or 

fertile--we can only surmise. And our surmise in this respect is 

liable to be wrong just as often as right. The only way the question 

can be decided is by experience. If the prospective husband is willing 

to take a chance, well and good. 

 

While just as many girls marry as do young men, still, in practice, we 


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