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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

always shall have to examine an incomparably larger number of male 

than of female candidates. This is due, not only to the fact that an 

incomparably larger number of men suffer from venereal disease, but 

also because very few women will confess to their fiances that they 

ever entertained antematrimonial relations and--what is still 

worse--were infected with venereal disease. This, of course, is owing 

to our double standard of morality, which looks upon as a trivial or 

no offense in the man what it condemns as a heinous crime in the 

woman. I have known hundreds of men who confessed freely to their 

fiancees that they had had gonorrhea, but I have known only two girls 

who made a confession of the fact to their future husbands. They got 

married, however, and lived happily with their husbands ever after. 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER THIRTY 

 

MARRIAGE AND SYPHILIS 

 

Rules for Permitting a Syphilitic Patient to Marry--Rules More 

Severe in Cases Where Children Are Desired--Where Both Partners 

Are Syphilitic--Danger of Paresis in Some Syphilitic Patients--A 

Case in the Author's Practice. 

 

 

The problem of the syphilitic differs from the problem of the 

exgonorrheal patient. When a gonorrheal patient is cured, so far as 

infectivity is concerned, and is not sterile, there is no apprehension 

as to the offspring. Gonorrhea is not hereditary, and the child of a 

gonorrheal patient does not differ from the child of a nongonorrheal 

person. In the case of syphilis, it is different. The patient may be 

safe so far as infecting the partner is concerned, but yet there may 

be danger for the offspring. 

 

The rules for permitting a man or a woman who once had syphilis to 

marry, therefore, are different from those applied to the gonorrheal 

patient. Here are the rules: 

 

1. I would make it an invariable rule that no syphilitic patient 

should marry or should be permitted to marry before _five_ years have 

elapsed from the day of infection. But the period of time alone is 

not sufficient; other conditions must be met before we may give a 

syphilitic patient permission to marry. 

 

2. The man or the woman must have received thorough systematic 

treatment for at least three years, either constantly or off and on, 

according to the physician's judgment. 

 

3. For at least one year before the intended marriage, the person must 

have been absolutely free from any manifestations of syphilis; that 

is, from any eruptions on the skin, from any mucous patches, swelling 

in the bones, ulcerations, and so on. 

 

4. Four Wassermann tests, taken at intervals of three months and at a 

time _when the patient was receiving no specific treatment_, must be 

absolutely negative. 

 

If these four conditions are fully met, then the patient may be 

permitted to marry. 


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