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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

laywoman, imbued with a sense of responsibility for the welfare of 

their presumptive future offspring and actuated, perhaps, also by some 

fear of infection, to consult a physician as to the advisability of 

the marriage, leaving it to him to make the decision and they abiding 

by that decision. 

 

As a matter of fact, as often is the case, the pendulum now is in 

danger of swinging to the other extreme; for, a little knowledge is a 

dangerous thing, and the tendency of the layman is to exaggerate 

matters and to take things in an absolute instead of in a relative 

manner. As a result, many laymen and laywomen nowadays insist upon a 

thorough examination of their own person and the person of their 

future partner, when there is nothing the matter with either. Still, 

this is a minor evil, and it is better to be too careful than not 

careful enough. 

 

I am frequently consulted as to the advisability or nonadvisability of 

a certain marriage taking place. I, therefore, thought it desirable to 

discuss in a separate chapter the various factors, physical and 

mental, personal and ancestral, likely to exert an influence upon the 

marital partner and on the expected offspring, and to state as briefly 

as possible and so far as our present state of knowledge permits which 

factors may be considered eugenic, or favorable to the offspring, and 

dysgenic, or unfavorable to the offspring. 

 

The questions concerning the advisability of marriage which the layman 

as well as the physician have most often to deal with are questions 

concerning venereal disease. On account of the importance of the 

subject, these have been discussed rather in detail under the headings 

"Gonorrhea and Marriage" and "Syphilis and Marriage." Other factors 

affecting marriage, either in the eugenic or dysgenic sense, will be 

discussed more briefly in the present chapter, and more or less in 

the order of their importance. 

 

 

=Tuberculosis= 

 

Tuberculosis, which carries off such a large part of humanity every 

year, is caused by the well-known bacillus tuberculosis, discovered by 

Koch. The germ is generally inhaled through the respiratory tract, and 

most frequently settles in the lungs, giving rise to what is known as 

pulmonary consumption. However, many other organs and tissues may be 

affected by tuberculosis. 

 

Tuberculosis used to be considered the hereditary disease _par 

excellence_. Entire families were carried off by it, and, seeing a 

tuberculous father or mother and then tuberculous children, it was 

assumed that the infection had been transmitted to the children by 

heredity. As a matter of fact, the disease was spread by infection. In 

former years, little care was exercised about destroying the sputum; 

the patients would spit indiscriminately on the floor, and the sputum, 


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