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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

drying up, would be mixed with the dust and inhaled. Often the 

children crawling on the floor would introduce the infective material 

directly, by putting their little fingers in their mouths. 

 

It is now known that tuberculosis is not a hereditary disease, that 

is, that the germs are not transmitted by heredity. _The weak 

constitution_, however, which favors the development of tuberculosis, 

is inherited. And children of tuberculous parents, therefore, must not 

only be guarded against infection, but must be brought up with special 

care, so as to strengthen their resistance and overcome the weakened 

constitution which they inherited. 

 

That a person with an active tuberculous lesion should not get married 

goes without saying. But, it is a good rule to follow for a 

tuberculous person not to marry for two or three years, until all 

tuberculous lesions have been declared healed by a competent 

physician. As a rule, a tuberculous patient is a poor provider, and 

that also counts in the advice against marriage. Then sexual 

intercourse has, as a rule, a strong influence on the development of 

the disease. Unfortunately the sexual appetite of tuberculous patients 

is not diminished, but, rather, very frequently heightened; and 

frequent sexual relations weaken them and hasten the progress of the 

disease. 

 

As to pregnancy, that has an extremely pernicious effect on the course 

of tuberculosis, and no tuberculous woman should ever marry. If such a 

one does marry or if the disease develops after her getting married, 

means should be given her to prevent her from having children. During 

the pregnancy, the disease may not seem to be making any 

progress--occasionally the patient may even seem to improve--but after 

childbirth the disease makes very rapid strides and the patient may 

quickly succumb. In the early days of my practice I saw a number of 

such cases. If precautions are taken against pregnancy, then 

permission to indulge in sexual relations may be given, provided it is 

done rarely and moderately. 

 

If a patient who has tuberculosis conceals the fact from the future 

partner, a fraud is committed, and the marriage is morally annullable. 

It has been declared legally annullable by a recent decision of a New 

York judge. 

 

 

=Heart Disease= 

 

Heart disease also is no longer considered hereditary. Nevertheless, 

heart disease, if at all serious, is a contraindication to marriage. 

First, because the patient's life may be cut off at any time. Second, 

sexual intercourse is injurious for people having heart disease; it 

may aggravate the disease or even cause sudden death. It is more 

injurious even than it is in tuberculosis. Third--and this concerns 

the woman only--pregnancy has a _very_ detrimental effect upon a 


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