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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

its work for years, often is suddenly snapped by the extra work put 

upon it by pregnancy and childbirth. Sometimes a woman with a diseased 

heart will keep up to the last minute of the delivery of the child and 

then suddenly will gasp and expire. In the first year of my practice I 

saw such a case, and I never have wanted to see another. Women 

suffering from heart disease of any serious character should not, 

under any circumstance, be permitted to become pregnant. 

 

 

=Cancer= 

 

No man will knowingly marry a woman, and no woman will marry a man, 

afflicted with cancer. However, this question often comes up in cases 

where the matrimonial candidates are free from cancer, but where there 

has been cancer in the family. 

 

Cancer is not a hereditary disease, contrary to the opinions that have 

prevailed, and, if the matrimonial candidate otherwise is healthy, no 

hesitation need be felt on the score of heredity. The fear of 

hereditary transmission of the disease has caused a great deal of 

mischief and unnecessary anxiety to people. Scientifically conducted 

investigations and carefully prepared statistics have shown that many 

diseases formerly considered hereditary are not hereditary in the 

least degree. 

 

Should it, however, be shown that in one family there were _many_ 

members who died of cancer, it would indicate that there is some 

disease or dyscrasia in that family, and the contracting of a marriage 

with any member of that family would be inadvisable. 

 

 

=Exophthalmic Goiter= (=Basedow's Disease=) 

 

Exophthalmic goiter is a disease characterised by enlargement of the 

thyroid gland, protrusion of the eyeballs, and rapid beating of the 

heart. The disease is confined almost entirely, though not 

exclusively, to women, and I should not advise any exophthalmic woman 

to marry; neither should I advise a man to marry an exophthalmic 

goiter woman. It is a very annoying disease, while sexual intercourse 

aggravates all the symptoms, particularly the palpitation of the 

heart. The children, if not affected by exophthalmic goiter, are 

liable to be very neurotic. 

 

_Simple goiter_, that is, enlargement of the thyroid gland (chiefly 

occurring in certain high mountainous localities, such as 

Switzerland), is not so strongly dysgenic as is exophthalmic goiter. 

Still, goiter patients are not good matrimonial risks. 

 

Of course, there are always exceptions. I know an exophthalmic goiter 

woman who brought up four children, and very good, healthy children 

they are. But in writing we can only speak of the average and not of 

exceptions. 

 

 

=Obesity= 

 

Obesity, or excessive stoutness, is an undue development of fat 

throughout the body. That it is hereditary, that it runs in families, 


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