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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

there is no question whatsoever. And, while with great care as to the 

diet and by proper exercise, obesity may, as a rule, be avoided in 

those predisposed, it none the less often will develop in spite of all 

measures taken against it. Some very obese people eat only one-half or 

less of what many thin people do; but in the former, everything seems 

to run to fat. 

 

Obesity must be considered a dysgenic factor. The obese are subject to 

heart disease, asthma, apoplexy, gallstones, gout, diabetes, 

constipation; they withstand pneumonia and acute infectious diseases 

poorly, and they are bad risks when they have to undergo major 

surgical operations. They also, as a rule, are readily fatigued by 

physical and mental work. (As to the latter, there are remarkable 

exceptions. Some very obese people can turn out a great amount of 

work, and are almost indefatigable in their constant activity.) Each 

case should be considered individually, and with reference to the 

respective family history. If the obese person comes from a healthy, 

long lived family and shows no circulatory disturbances, no strong 

objections can be raised to him or to her. But, as a general 

proposition, it must be laid down that obesity is a dysgenic factor. 

 

But bear in mind that obesity and stoutness are not synonymous terms. 

 

 

=Arteriosclerosis= 

 

Arteriosclerosis means hardening of the arteries. All men over fifty 

are beginning to develop some degree of arteriosclerosis; but, if the 

process is very gradual, it may be considered normal and is not a 

danger to life; when, however, it develops rapidly and the blood 

pressure is of a high degree, there is danger of apoplexy. 

Consequently, arteriosclerosis and high blood pressure must be 

considered decided bars to marriage. 

 

It must be borne in mind that the sexual act is, in itself, a danger 

to arteriosclerotics and people with high blood pressure, because it 

may bring about rupture of a blood-vessel. There are many cases of 

sudden death from this cause of which the public naturally never 

learns. Married persons who find that they have arteriosclerosis or 

high blood pressure should abstain from sexual relations altogether or 

indulge only at rare intervals and moderately. 

 

 

=Gout= 

 

A consideration of gout in connection with the question of heredity 

will show how near-sighted people can be, how they can go on believing 

a certain thing for centuries without analyzing, until somebody 

suddenly shows them the absurdity of the thing. Gout was always 

considered a typical hereditary disease; for it was seen in the 

grandfathers, fathers, children, grandchildren, and so on. So, 

certainly, it must be hereditary! It did not come to our doctors' 

minds to think that perhaps, after all, it was not heredity that was 


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