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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

sterile. 

 

The same thing happens to girls attacked by mumps. They may have a 

severe inflammation of the ovaries (ovaritis or ooephoritis) or the 

inflammation may be so mild as to escape notice. In either case, the 

girl when grown to womanhood may find herself sterile. 

 

A man who never had any venereal disease, but who has had mumps, 

should have himself examined for sterility before he gets married. As 

explained in the chapter "Marriage and Gonorrhea," we can, in the 

case of a man, easily find out whether he is fertile or sterile. But, 

in the case of a woman, we can not. Time, necessarily, has to answer 

that question. In all cases, mumps reduces the chances of fertility, 

and no man or woman who once had mumps should get married without 

informing the respective partner of the fact. There should be no 

concealment before marriage. When the partners to the marriage 

contract know of the facts, they can then decide as to whether or not 

the marriage is desirable to them. 


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