Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

(hyperesthesia), so that the least touch causes great pain; in others, 

there is complete anesthesia--that is, absence of sensation--so that 

when you stick the patient with a needle she will not feel it. A very 

frequent symptom is a choking sensation, as if a ball came up the 

throat and stuck there (globus hystericus). Then there may be spasms, 

convulsions, retention of urine, paralysis, aphonia (loss of voice), 

blindness, and a lot more. There is hardly a functional or organic 

nervous disorder that hysteria may not simulate. 

 

Of late years our ideas about hysteria have undergone a radical 

change, and we now know that most, if not all, cases of hysteria are 

due to a repression or non-satisfaction of the sexual instinct or to 

some shock of a sexual character in childhood. Only too often a girl 

who was very hysterical before marriage loses her hysteria as if by 

magic upon contracting a _satisfactory_ marriage. On the other hand, a 

healthy girl can become quickly hysterical if she marries a man who is 

sexually impotent or who is disagreeable to her and incapable of 

satisfying her sexually. 

 

While hysteria, in itself, is not hereditary, it, nevertheless, is a 

question whether a strongly hysterical woman would make a satisfactory 

mother. The entire family history should be investigated. If the 

hysteria is found to be an isolated instance in the given girl, it may 

be disregarded, if not extreme; but if the entire family or several 

members of it are neuropathic, the condition is a dysgenic one. 

Marriage may be contracted, provided no children are brought into the 

world until several years have elapsed and the mother's organization 

seems to have become more stable. In some cases, a child acts as a 

good medicine against hysteria. In short, every case must be examined 

individually on its merits, and the counsel of a good psychologist or 

psychoanalyst may prove very valuable. 

 

 

=Alcoholism= 

 

A good deal depends upon what we understand by alcoholism. The 

fanatics consider a person an alcoholic who drinks a glass of beer or 

wine with his meals. This is nonsense. This is not alcoholism, and 

cannot be considered a dysgenic factor. But, where there is a distinct 

habit, so that the individual _must_ have his alcohol daily, or if he 

goes on an occasional drunken "spree," marriage must be advised 

against. And where the man (or woman) is what we call a real drunkard, 

marriage not only should be advised against, but most decidedly should 

be prohibited by law. 

 

Alcoholism, as a habit, is one of the worst dysgenic factors to reckon 

with. First, the offspring is liable to be affected, which is 

sufficient in itself to condemn marriage with an alcoholic. Second, 

the earning powers of an alcoholic are generally diminished, and are 


Page 2 from 7:  Back   1  [2]  3   4   5   6   7   Forward