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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

whether they have a strong or weak libido, or any at all. And whether 

or no a given woman would derive any pleasure from the sexual act can 

only be found out after marriage. Many girls, however, know very well 

whether they are "passionate" or not, but they wouldn't tell. They are 

afraid to confess to a complete lack of passion--they fear they might 

lose a husband. 

 

Frigidity as an agent in marriage may be considered from two points of 

view: the offspring and the husband. The offspring is not affected by 

the mother's frigidity. A very frigid woman, if the frigidity is not 

due to serious organic causes, may have very healthy children and make 

an excellent mother. As far as the husband is concerned, it will 

depend a good deal on the degree of frigidity. If the woman is merely 

cold, and, while herself not enjoying the act, raises no objection to 

it, then it cannot be considered a bar to marriage. In fact many men, 

themselves not overstrong sexually, are praying for somewhat frigid 

wives. (It must be stated, however, that to some husbands relations 

with frigid and non-participating wives are extremely distasteful.) 

But when the frigidity is of such a degree that it amounts to a strong 

physical aversion to the act, it should be considered a bar to 

marriage. Such frigidity is often the cause of a disrupted home, often 

leads to divorce and is legally considered a sufficient cause for 

divorce or for the annulment of marriage, the same as impotence in the 

man is. 

 

 

=Excessive Libido in Men= 

 

We have seen that sexual impotence is a dysgenic factor and if 

complete and incurable should constitute a barrier to marriage. The 

opposite condition is that of excessive libido. Libido is the desire 

for the opposite sex. A proper amount of libido is normal and 

desirable. A lack of libido is abnormal. And an excess of libido is 

also abnormal. But a good many men are possessed of an excess of 

libido; it is either congenital or _acquired_. Some men torture their 

wives "to death," not literally but figuratively. Harboring the 

prevailing idea that a wife has no rights in this respect, that her 

body is not her own, that she must always hold herself ready to 

satisfy his abnormal desires, such a husband exercises his marital 

rights without consideration for the physical condition or the mental 

feelings of his partner. Some husbands demand that their wives satisfy 

them _daily_ from one to five or more times a day. Some wives who 

happen to be possessed of an equally strong libido do not mind these 

excessive demands (though in time they are almost sure to feel the 

evil effects), but if the wife possesses only a moderate amount of 

sexuality and if she is too weak in body and in will-power to resist 

her lord and master's demands, her health is often ruined and she 


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