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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

 

 

=Myopia= 

 

Myopia means nearsightedness. This defect is undoubtedly hereditary to 

a certain degree, but it is doubtful if, other conditions being 

favorable, any man would give up a girl because she is myopic or vice 

versa. Still, if the condition is extreme, as it sometimes is, it 

should be taken into consideration. And where both the man and the 

woman are strongly myopic some hesitation should be felt in 

contracting a marriage. If the husband alone is myopic, then the 

defect may be transmitted to the sons but not to the daughters, and 

these daughters may in their turn transmit the defect to their sons 

but not to their daughters. In other words, the defect is more or less 

_sex-limited_. 

 

 

=Astigmatism= 

 

This is a defect of the eye, depending upon some irregularity of the 

cornea or the lens, in which light rays in different meridians are not 

brought to the same focus. It is to a certain extent hereditary, but 

plays an insignificant role. It is an undesirable trait, but cannot be 

considered a dysgenic factor. 

 

 

=Baldness= 

 

Premature baldness is a decidedly inheritable trait. And so is 

premature grayness of the hair. But it is doubtful if any woman would 

permit these factors to play any role in her choice of a husband. 

 

 

=Criminality= 

 

Almost a complete change has taken place in our ideas of criminality, 

and there are but very few criminologists now who believe in the 

Lombrosian nonsense of most criminality being inherited and being 

accompanied by physical stigmata of degeneration. The idea that the 

criminal is born and not made is now held only by an insignificant 

number of thinkers. We know now that by far the greatest percentage 

of crime is the result of environment, of poverty, with all that that 

word implies, of bad bringing up, of bad companions. We know that the 

child of the criminal, properly brought up, will develop into a model 

citizen, and vice versa, the child of the saint, brought into the 

slums, might develop into a criminal. 

 

Then we must remember that there are many crimes which are not crimes, 

per se, but which are merely infractions of man-made laws, or 

representing rebellious acts against an unjust and cruel social order. 

Thus, for instance, a man or a woman who defying the law, would give 

information about birth control, and be convicted for the offence, 

would be legally a criminal. Morally he or she would be a high-minded 

humanitarian. A man who would throw a bomb at the Russian Czar or at a 

murderous pogrom-inciting Russian Governor would be considered an 

assassin, and if caught would be hanged; and in making up the pedigree 

of such a family, a narrow-minded eugenist would be apt to say that 

there was criminality in that family. But as a matter of fact, that 

"assassin" may have belonged to the noblest-minded heroes in history. 


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