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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

children. 

 

 

=Contraceptive Measures= 

 

And the argument that contraceptives are injurious to the health of 

the woman, of the man, or of both, may be curtly dismissed. It is not 

true of any of the modern contraceptives. But even if it were true, 

the amount of injury that can be done by contraceptives would be like 

a drop of water in comparison with the injuries resulting from 

excessive pregnancies and childbirths. Some of the contraceptive 

measures require some trouble to use, some are unesthetic, but these 

are trifles and constitute a small price to pay for the privilege of 

being able to regulate the number of one's offspring according to 

one's intelligent desires. 

 

The commonest argument now made against contraceptives is that they 

are not absolutely safe, that is, absolutely to be relied upon, that 

they will not prevent in absolutely every case. This is true; but 

there are three answers which render this objection invalid. First, 

many of the cases of failure are to be ascribed not to the 

contraceptives themselves, but to their improper, careless and 

unintelligent use. The best methods in the world will fail if used 

improperly. Second, if the measures are efficient in 98 or 99 per 

cent, and fail in one or two per cent., then they are a blessing. Some 

women would be the happiest women in the world if they could render 98 

per cent. of their conjugal relations unfruitful. Third, the 

imperfections of our contraceptive measures are due to the secrecy 

with which the entire subject must necessarily be surrounded. If the 

subject of birth control could be fully discussed in medical books 

there is no doubt that in a short time we would have measures that 

would be absolutely certain and would leave nothing to be desired. But 

even such as they are, the measures are better than none, and as said 

in the beginning of this chapter, it is the duty of every young woman 

to acquire as one of the items of her sex education the knowledge of 

how to avoid too frequent pregnancies. In fact, I consider this the 

most important item in a woman's sex education, and if she has learned 

nothing else she should learn this. For this information is 

_absolutely_ necessary to her future health and happiness. 

 

 

=A Few Everyday Cases= 

 

In my twenty years' work for the cause of rational birth control I 

have come in contact with thousands and thousands of cases which 

demonstrate in the most convincing manner possible the tragic results 

of forced or undesired motherhood, and of the fear of forced or 

undesired motherhood. 

 

Some of the cases were in my own practice, some were related to me by 

brother physicians, some were described to me by the victims living in 

all parts of this vast country. Were I to collect and report all the 

cases that came to my notice during those twenty years, they would 


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