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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

entirely different matter, and has nothing to do with cases where the 

man is the pursuer or seducer and the woman an unwilling or reluctant 

victim. 

 

But whatever the relations between the man and the girl may be, 

whether she yielded in a fit of passion, or was seduced by false 

promises, by "moral" suasion, by hypnotic influence or by the vulgar 

method of being made drunk, what is she to do if she finds herself, to 

her horror, in a pregnant condition? There are two ways open to her: 

either let the pregnancy go to term or to have an abortion brought on. 

 

If she lets the pregnancy go to term she has the alternative of 

bringing up the child herself openly or of placing it secretly in a 

foundling asylum. In the first case, the necessity of publicly 

acknowledging illegitimate motherhood requires so much moral courage 

that not one woman in a thousand is equal to it. It is not moral 

courage alone that is required; the social ostracism could be borne 

with stoicism and even with equanimity, if with it were not frequently 

associated the fear or the real danger of starvation. For under our 

present system the illegitimate mother finds many avenues of activity 

closed to her. A school teacher would lose her position instantly, and 

so would a woman in any public position. It is feared that her example 

might have a contaminating influence on the children or on her fellow 

workers. Nor could she be a social worker--I know of more than one 

woman who lost her position with social or philanthropic institutions 

as soon as it was discovered that she did not live up strictly to the 

conventional code of sex morality. Nor could she be a private 

governess. 

 

It is thus seen that to acknowledge one's self an illegitimate mother 

requires so much courage, so much sacrifice, that very, very few 

mothers are now found that are equal to the task. Especially so when 

it is taken into consideration that the humiliations and indignities 

to which the child is subjected and the later reproaches of the child 

itself make the mother's life a veritable hell. So this alternative is 

generally out of the question. 

 

To give the child to a foundling asylum or to a "baby farm" means 

generally to condemn it to a slow death--and not such a slow one, 

either. For as statistics show about ninety to ninety-five per cent. 

of all babies in those institutions die within a few months. And the 

very few who survive and grow up have not a happy life. Life is hard 

enough for anybody; for children who come into the world handicapped 

by the disgrace of illegitimacy, life is torture indeed. It is with a 

breaking heart generally and because there is no other way out of the 

dilemma that a mother puts her baby away in a foundling asylum. She 


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