Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

CHAPTER THIRTY-FOUR 

 

ADVICE TO PARENTS OF UNFORTUNATE GIRLS 

 

Attitude of Parents Towards Unfortunate Girl--The Case of Edith 

and What Her Father Did--The Pitiful Cases of Mary B. and Bridget 

C. 

 

 

Suppose you are the parents of a girl to whom a misfortune has 

happened. I admit it is a misfortune, a catastrophe. Probably the 

greatest catastrophe that, under our present social system, can happen 

to an unmarried young woman. What are you going to do? Are you going to 

disgrace her--incidentally disgracing yourselves--are you going to kick 

her out of the house, condemning her to a suicide's grave, or to a life 

that is often worse than death? Or are you going to stand by her in her 

dark hours, to shield her, to surround her with a wall of protection 

against a cruel and wantonly inquisitive world, and thus earn her 

eternal gratitude, and put her on the path of self-improvement and 

useful social work? Which shall it be? But before you decide, kindly 

bear in mind that your girl is not entirely to blame; that some of the 

blame lies with you. If she had been _properly_ brought up, this would 

not have happened. I know such a thing could never have happened in my 

household. But I know how I would have acted if such a thing had 

happened. And I will tell you how one father and mother did act under 

the circumstances. 

 

They were far from rich; just fairly comfortable; they had a 

well-paying store. Edith was their treasure, because she was so pretty 

and so full of life. Unfortunately, she was too pretty and too full of 

life. She was only seventeen, but was fully developed, and had many 

empty-headed young admirers, who showered upon her silly compliments 

and cloying sweets. She became frivolous and flirtatious and was 

beginning to do poorly in high school. She failed in her last year, 

and refused to take the year over again. Now, all the time being her 

own, and having nobody to give any account to, she began to go out a 

good deal, and more than ever indulged in flirtations. One night she 

stayed out later than usual, her parents were worried, and when she 

came home about two in the morning there was a quarrel, and the 

father, who was a strict, impulsive man, gave her a pretty good 

beating. After that she went out very little, kept to herself, became 

rather melancholy, lost her appetite, and did not sleep well. To all 

inquiries she answered that there was nothing the matter with her, 

that she just felt a little indisposed. Four or five months thus 

passed. 

 

But finally the condition could no longer be concealed. The mother was 

the first one to discover it. When the fact dawned upon her 

consciousness that her beautiful, not quite eighteen-year-old Edith 

was pregnant she promptly fell in a faint and it took Edith and the 


Page 1 from 7: [1]  2   3   4   5   6   7   Forward