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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

maid quite some time to restore her to consciousness. She became 

distracted. She floundered about pitifully, not knowing what to do, 

what decision to reach. She tried to conceal the matter from the 

father, but he saw that there was something wrong and it didn't take 

him long to worm the truth out of her. As the mother on learning the 

tragic truth had taken refuge in a dead faint, so he took refuge in a 

Berserker rage. He fumed and stormed and was in danger of an 

apoplectic stroke. He wanted to strike the daughter, but the mother 

interfered. He then ordered Edith to get out of the house and never to 

cross his threshold again. Edith looked at him to see if he meant it; 

the mother tried to intercede; but he was inflexible, and demanded 

that she leave at once. Edith began to gather a few of her belongings, 

the tears silently rolling down her face. 

 

And here a sudden change came over the father. Some men (and women) 

are crushed by small misfortunes; real catastrophes awaken their 

finer qualities, which lay dormant within them and which might have 

remained dormant within them forever. In these few minutes he seems to 

have undergone a complete metamorphosis. He went up to Edith, took her 

in his arms, kissed her, told her to stay, to calm down and they would 

see what could be done. In a few days she was taken over to a 

physician who performed an abortion. She was a pretty sick girl for 

about six weeks, and at one time there was danger of blood poisoning 

setting in. But she recovered. And she was a different girl. She had 

shed her frivolity and lightheartedness like an old garment. She took 

her last year in high school over again, entered Barnard, from which 

she was graduated among the very first, and soon began to teach in 

that very high school in which she had been a pupil. One of the 

teachers fell in love with her and she fell in love with him. He asked 

her to marry him. She wanted no skeleton from the past coming down 

rattling its bones and marring their married life, and she told him of 

the unfortunate incident. A good test, by the way, to find out a man's 

real love and breadth of character. Fortunately the man's love was a 

true love, not merely passion, and he was truly broadminded, which is 

not a very common thing among school-teachers. Their married life is 

an uncloudedly happy one. And the relation between the daughter and 

the parents is one of sincere love and deep mutual respect. 

 

Isn't it better so? 

 

Didn't Edith's parents act more decently, more kindly, more humanely, 

more wisely than the parents, say, of Mary B, who, when they found out 

her condition, put her out of the house, into which she was brought 

back two days later a corpse, fished out from the East River? Didn't 

Edith's father act more nobly, more wisely even from a purely selfish 


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