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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

the passage of a child's head. The length of the vaginal canal is 

between three and five inches, but it is in general much more 

capacious in women that have borne one or more children than in those 

who have not borne any. 

 

Near the vaginal entrance are situated two small glands; they are 

about the size of a pea, and secrete mucus. They are called 

Bartholin's glands; occasionally they become inflamed and give a good 

deal of trouble. 

 

[Illustration: ANTEVERSION OF THE UTERUS.] 

 

[Illustration: ANTEFLEXION OF THE UTERUS.] 

 

[Illustration: RETROVERSION OF THE UTERUS.] 

 

[Illustration: RETROFLEXION OF THE UTERUS.] 

 

=The Hymen= [hymen in Greek--a membrane]. The external opening of the 

vagina, in virgins, that is, in girls or women who have not had sexual 

intercourse, is almost entirely closed by a membrane called the hymen. 

The vulgar name for hymen is "maidenhead." The hymen may be of various 

shapes, and of different consistency. In some girls it is a very thin 

membrane, which tears very readily; in others it is quite tough. On 

the upper margin or in the center of the hymen there is an opening 

which permits any secretion from the vagina and the blood from the 

uterus to come through. In rare cases there is no opening in the 

hymen, that is, the vagina is entirely closed. Such a hymen is called 

_imperforate_ (not perforated). When the girl begins to menstruate, 

the blood cannot come out and it accumulates in the vagina. In such 

cases the hymen must be opened or slit by a doctor. In some cases the 

hymen is congenitally absent; that is, the girl is born without any 

hymen. While the hymen is usually ruptured during the first 

intercourse, it, in some cases, being elastic and stretchable, 

persists untorn after sexual intercourse. It will therefore be seen 

that just as the presence of the hymen is no absolute proof of 

virginity, so is the absence of the hymen no absolute proof that the 

girl has had sexual relations, She might have been born without any 

hymen, or it might have been ruptured by vaginal examination, by a 

vaginal douche, by scratching to relieve itching, or by some accident. 

 

The remains of the hymen after it is ruptured shrink and form little 

elevations which can be easily felt; they are known as caruncles. 

[In Latin, _carunculae myrtiformes_, which means in English 

myrtleberry-shaped caruncles; caruncle is a small fleshy elevation; 

derived from _caro_, which in Latin means flesh.] 

 

 

SUBCHAPTER B 

 

THE EXTERNAL GENITALS 

 

=The Vulva.= The external genitals of the female are called the 

_vulva_. The vulva consists of the labia majora (meaning the larger 

lips), which are on the outside and which in the grown-up girl are 

covered with hair, and the labia minora (the smaller lips), which are 


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