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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

on the inside and which are usually only seen when the labia majora 

are taken apart. 

 

[Vulva in Latin means folding-door. The ancients Were fond of giving 

fancy names to things.] 

 

=The Mons Veneris.= The elevation above the vulva, which during 

puberty becomes covered with hair, is called by the fanciful name, 

_mons Veneris_, or Venus' mountain. It is usually well padded with 

fatty tissue. 

 

=The Clitoris.= The clitoris is a small body about an inch in length, 

situated beneath the mons Veneris and partly or entirely covered by 

the upper borders of the labia minora. 

 

=The Urethra.= Between the clitoris above and the opening of the 

vagina below is situated the opening of the _urethra_, or the urinary 

meatus, through which the urine passes. Many women are so ignorant, 

or, let us say innocent, that they think the urine passes out through 

the vagina. This is not so. The vagina has nothing to do with the 

process of urination. 

 

Again enumerating the female sex organs, but in the reverse order, 

from before backward, or from out inward, we have: The mons Veneris 

and the labia majora, or the external lips of the vulva; these are the 

plainly visible parts of the female genital organs. When the labia 

majora are taken apart we see the labia minora; when the labia majora 

and minora are taken apart we can see or feel the clitoris and the 

hymen, or the remains of the hymen. We then have the vagina, a large, 

stretchable musculo-membranous canal, in the upper portion of which 

the neck of the womb, or the cervix, can be seen (when a speculum is 

used), or felt by the finger. Only the cervix, or neck of the womb, 

can be seen, but the rest of the womb, the broader portion, can be 

easily felt and examined by one hand in the vagina and the other hand 

over the abdomen. Continuous with the uterus are the Fallopian tubes, 

and below the trumpet-shaped ends of the Fallopian tubes are the 

ovaries, embedded in the broad ligaments, one on each side. 

 

=The Breasts.= The breasts, also called mammary glands, or mammae 

[mamma in Latin, breast], may be considered as accessory organs of 

reproduction. They are of no importance in the male, in whom they are 

usually rudimentary, but they are of great importance in the female. 

They manufacture milk, which is necessary for the proper nutrition of 

the infant, and they add a great deal to the beauty and attractiveness 

of the woman. They are thus a help to the woman in getting a mate or a 

husband. The projecting elevation of the breast, which the child takes 

in his mouth when nursing, is called the nipple; the darker colored 

area surrounding the nipple is called the areola. 

 

[Illustration: THE PELVIS OF THE MALE.] 

 

[Illustration: THE PELVIS OF THE FEMALE.] 

 

 

SUBCHAPTER C 

 

THE PELVIS 


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