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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

 

The internal sex organs are situated in the lower part of the 

abdominal cavity, the part that is called the _pelvis_, or pelvic 

cavity. The meaning of the word pelvis in Latin is basin. The pelvis, 

also referred to as the pelvic girdle or pelvic arch, forms a bony 

basin, and is composed of three powerful bones: the sacrum, consisting 

of five vertebrae fused together and constituting the solid part of the 

spine, or vertebral column, in the back, and the two hipbones, one on 

each side. The two hipbones meet in front, forming the _pubic arch_. 

 

The hipbones are called in Latin the ossa innominata (nameless bones) 

and each hipbone is composed of three bones: the ilium, the ischium, 

and the os pubis. The thighs are attached to the hipbones, and to the 

hipbones are also attached the large _gluteal_ muscles, which form the 

buttocks, or the "seat." 

 

The pelvis of the female differs considerably from the pelvis of the 

male. The female pelvis is shallower and wider, less massive, the 

margins of the bones are more widely separated, thus giving greater 

prominence to the hips; the sacrum is shorter and less curved, and the 

pubic arch is wider and more rounded. All this is necessary in order 

to permit the child's head to pass through. If the female pelvis were 

exactly like the male pelvis, a full-term living child could never 

pass through it. The two illustrations show the differences between 

the male and female pelvis very clearly. 

 

Note particularly the differences in the pubic arches: in the male 

pelvis it is really more of an angle than an arch. Also note how much 

longer and more solid the sacrum (with its attached bone, called the 

coccyx[2]) is in the male pelvis. The differences in the pelves (the 

plural of pelvis is pelves) of the male and female become fully marked 

at puberty, but they are present as early as the fourth month of 

intra-uterine life. 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[1] Mucous membrane--briefly a membrane which secretes mucus or some 

other fluid. 

 

[2] The coccyx consists of three rudimentary vertebrae; it is the 

vestige of an organ which we once possessed in common with many other 

animals, namely--a tail. 

 


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