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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

CHAPTER THIRTY-NINE 

 

STERILITY 

 

Definition of Sterility--Husband Should First be Examined-- 

One-child Sterility--The Fertile Woman--Salpingitis as a 

Cause of Sterility--Leucorrhea and Sterility--Displacement of 

Uterus and Sterility--Closure of Neck of Womb and Sterility-- 

Sterility and Constitutional Disease--Treatment of Sterility. 

 

 

Sterility or barrenness is a condition of inability to have children. 

In former years the opinion prevailed generally, whenever a couple was 

childless, that the fault was exclusively the woman's. It wasn't even 

thought that the man could be to blame. We now know that in at least 

_fifty per cent._ of cases of sterility, or childless marriages, the 

fault is not the woman's but the man's. It is therefore very unwise in 

conditions of sterility to subject the wife to treatment without first 

examining the husband. Nevertheless, this is still often the case, 

particularly among the lower classes or among the ignorant. There are 

cases where the woman goes from one doctor to another for years and is 

subjected to all kinds of treatment, when a simple examination of the 

husband would show that the fault lies with him. 

 

Some women have one child and are unable afterwards to give birth to 

any more. Such a condition is called one-child-sterility. It is 

generally due to an inflammation of the Fallopian tubes which closes 

up the openings of the tubes into the womb, so that no more ova can 

pass _from_ the ovaries _through_ the tubes _into_ the womb. This 

inflammation may be the result of childbirth, for childbirth alone may 

set up an inflammation, or it may be due to an infection contracted 

from the husband. 

 

In order to be fertile, that is, to be able to conceive and give birth 

to a living child, the woman's external and internal genital organs 

must be normal, her ovaries must produce healthy ova, and there must 

be no obstruction on the way, so that the ova and the spermatozoa can 

meet. The mucous membrane of the womb must also be healthy, so that 

when the impregnated ovum gets attached to the womb it may develop 

there without any trouble, and not become diseased or poorly nourished 

and cast off. 

 

We must always remember that the woman's share in bringing forth 

children and perpetuating the race is much more important than the 

man's. When a man has discharged his spermatozoa his work is done--the 

woman's only commences. 

 

The conditions which cause sterility in women are many, but the most 

common cause is a salpingitis or an inflammation of the Fallopian 

tubes, which may be caused by gonorrhea or any other inflammation. A 

severe leucorrhea may also be the cause of sterility, because the 

leucorrheal discharge may be fatal to the spermatozoa. Another cause 

is a severe bending or turning of the uterus either forwards or 


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