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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

this is far from being the case, because, as all advanced sexologists 

will tell you, there is generally something wrong with a man who 

remains absolutely chaste until the age of thirty, thirty-five or 

forty. It isn't moral principles in all cases; it is mostly cowardice, 

or sexual weakness. And sad as it may be to state, these perfectly 

good, chaste men do not generally make satisfactory husbands, and 

their wives are not apt to be the happiest ones. I fully agree with 

Professor Freud in his statement "that sexual abstinence does not help 

to build up energetic, independent men of action, original thinkers, 

bold advocates of freedom and reform, but rather goody-goody 

weaklings." And still more to the purpose is the statement of 

Professor Michels, who says: 

 

"The desire that one's daughter may marry a man who, like herself, and 

on an equal footing, will gain in marriage his first experience of the 

most sacred mysteries of the sexual life, is one which _may lead to 

profound disillusionments_. Even if to-day the demand for chaste young 

men is extremely restricted, the supply is yet more so, and the 

article _is of such an inferior quality_ that in actual practice the 

attempt to satisfy this desire is likely to lead to results which will 

fail altogether to correspond to the hopes inspired by a contemplation 

of the abstract idea of purity. Many physically intact individuals of 

both sexes _are far more contaminated_ than those who have had actual 

sexual experience. Others again, superior in the abstract, and from 

the physically sexual aspect, are _ethically inferior to the 

unchaste_, so that the union with these latter would be more likely to 

prove happy than a union with those who are nominally pure." And 

further, "Careful fathers of marriageable daughters, who seek this 

virginity in their sons-in-law, will, if they find it, seldom find it 

a guarantee for the simultaneous possession of solid moral qualities." 

 

All a girl has a right to demand is that her future husband be in good 

health, physically and sexually, and that he be free from venereal 

disease. His previous sexual life, provided he is a man of fine moral 

character in general, is no concern of hers. Even if the man was 

unfortunate enough to have contracted gonorrhea, that fact should 

constitute no bar to marriage, provided he is completely cured of it. 

The only exception is that of syphilis. The girl has a right to refuse 

absolutely to enter into union with any man who has been infected with 

syphilis unless she is willing, and does it with her eyes open, to 

live her life without any children. In syphilis we can never give an 

_absolute guarantee_ of cure and we have no right to subject a woman 

to any danger of infection with syphilis, be the danger ever so 


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