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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

three cases the author relates without any comment, taking them 

evidently for pure coin. The fourth case the lady investigated, and 

she is frank to say that what seemed at first as a clear case of 

maternal impression was nothing of the kind but merely a case of 

heredity. In order to break the monotony for a little while I will 

reproduce here the four cases in the lady's own words. 

 

The first was that of "a mother who, during pregnancy, was 

obliged for a certain continuous time to eat sheep's flesh. She 

took such a sudden abhorrence and distaste of the meat that she 

only ate it rather than go meat hungry. After the birth of her 

baby she recovered from this spasmodic distaste of this 

particular meat. But the child from its first meat-eating days 

could not endure the smell or the taste of the sheep's flesh. 

Whenever the child attempted to eat that meat, the result was 

always the same--indigestion and want of assimilation, and 

usually attended with acute indigestion cramps." 

 

In the second case "another pregnant mother's particular 

'longing' was for mackerel. Her baby was born with what seemed 

to be the outlines, in a brownish color, of a mackerel on its 

side, and which design never faded in after years, and the 

child's ability to eat and digest mackerel was more than 

normal." 

 

The third case: "The 'longing' of another pregnant mother was 

for brains to eat. This was provided for her. But as she was 

slowly approaching the dish of deliciously prepared food, 

quivering with delight and with the eagerness of a child to be 

eating it, a cat sprang to the plate and before she could 

prevent it ate the brains and licked the plate clean. She wept 

as a child might have done, and was as unhappy and brokenhearted 

over this fate of the brains food for which she had waited with 

such keen anticipation of satisfaction as a little child might 

have been. Shortly after that the little baby was born, and upon 

one of its shoulder-blades was a representation of the mess of 

brains, designed in brownish outlines, and which did not fade as 

the child grew up." 

 

The fourth case: "There lived in a little house in the midst of 

a flower garden, that in its turn gave into a wide-spreading 

orchard, a loving and loyal husband and wife with their 

firstborn child. The wife was now in the first months of 

pregnancy with her second child. Their nearest neighbor was a 

Mexican family, among the members of which was a dashing young 

man of about twenty-two. He and his sister and mother were 

frequent visitors to this little household of three. But the 

young Mexican was the most frequent, and the husband's being 


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