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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

home or not did not disconcert him. Men of affairs must need 

spend morning hours, and sometimes afternoon hours, too, inside 

of offices, but wealthy and aristocratic young Mexicans ride 

horses all day, decked out with silver, leather, and velvet 

trappings, both horse and rider. It was this lady's custom to 

walk among her flowers and fruit trees. And it became the custom 

of this young caballero to suddenly appear before her during 

these promenades. Her startled eyes would no sooner perceive the 

vision of his blazing, dark eyes fastened upon her, than by one 

pretext and another she made him understand that he was 

dismissed, and would herself retire into the house. When she 

would be about to open a gate, suddenly and unexpectedly the 

young Mexican would appear on the other side and with gracious 

suavity open the gate, always his passionate, dark eyes upon 

her, though his words were reserved and polite. If the husband 

were present, it was still the same. By every means possible he 

would prolong his stay. 

 

One summer day this lady was lying on her couch on the veranda, 

sleeping, her eyes covered over. At that time she was having an 

eye malady that was epidemic in that part of the country. She 

heard footsteps approaching, but did not disturb herself, as she 

supposed it was her husband. After some time she suddenly threw 

off the covering from her face, and there to her astonished eyes 

stood the young Mexican, intensely looking down upon her with 

deep concern. At that moment the husband arrived, and the young 

man told him of a weed growing in that locality that he said 

would cure the eye malady. When the leaves of this plant were 

crushed there oozed a yellowish milk; with about a half-dozen 

applications of this milk to the sore eyes they were healed. 

 

After that the young caballero would ride up and down, Mexican 

fashion, in front of the house, drawing rein whenever he could 

get a glimpse of the lady or a word with her. This never failed 

to annoy her, and also to strike a sudden, sharp terror into 

her heart. Always his appearance was most unexpected, and 

always accompanied by the rapt, passionate, dark gaze. Though he 

was a most clean-souled young man. 

 

Afterward, when the baby was born, one of the child's eyes was 

marked by the color and fire of the dashing Spaniard's eyes, 

while its other eye was a calmish blue-gray eye. This was all 

the more remarkable as neither of the parents of the child had 

such eyes. Was it a case of maternal impression? 

 

Upon investigation I found that the grandparents of the baby's 


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