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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

motto. There will always be time to get a divorce. While if a divorce 

has been obtained, even if you regret it, you will most likely stay 

divorced. Many divorced couples, I imagine, would remarry, if they 

were not ashamed. They fear it would make them ridiculous--and it 

would--in their friends' eyes. 

 

 

=Outsiders in Domestic Tangles= 

 

If you have a disagreement with your husband, try to straighten out 

the tangle yourself. Don't call in outside help. You will regret it. A 

stranger's paws are too coarse and too unsympathetic to meddle with 

the delicate adjustments which constitute marital life, and after you 

have gotten over your disagreement and are again living harmoniously 

you will be ashamed to look that third party in the face, and you will 

probably bear a grudge against him--or her. 

 

Altogether outsiders are not fit to mix in the internal differences 

between husband and wife. It is absolutely impossible for a stranger 

to know just where the trouble is and who the guilty party is. 

Sometimes there is no guilty party. Both husband and wife may be 

right; they may both be lovely people and still together they may form 

an incompatible, explosive mixture. And then again the party that to 

outsiders may seem the angelic one may in reality be the devilish one. 

It is a well-known fact that people who to the outside world may seem 

the personification of honor and good nature may be very devils at 

home. I have long ago given up not only meddling in, but even judging, 

domestic disharmonies. For it is almost impossible for an outsider to 

judge justly. I knew a husband who was considered a paragon of virtue. 

And when a clash came between him and his wife everybody was inclined 

to blame the wife. But it came out later that the husband had certain 

ways about him which made the wife's life a very torture. And vice 

versa. I know of another case where the wife was considered the 

sweetest thing in the world. She had nice ways about her, but she 

disliked her husband and made his life a hell. With genuine chivalry 

he bore everything, believing that it was a man's duty to bear his 

cross. She was unfaithful to him, but she was so clever and cunning 

that neither he nor anybody else suspected it. The fact became 

painfully patent to him, when on one of the rare occasions that they 

came together she infected him with a venereal disease, which 

incapacitated him for a long time. Nobody knew why he insisted upon a 

separation, and everybody, with the exception of his physician and 

perhaps one or two others, was blaming him for an unfeeling brute. 

 

I will therefore repeat that as a general thing domestic tangles 

should be untangled by the tanglers themselves. It is not safe to call 


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