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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

 

In fact I make the assertion that real love, true love, is a new 

feeling, a comparatively modern feeling, absent in the lower races and 

reaching its highest development only in people of high civilization, 

culture and education. 

 

The platitudinous objection might be raised that "human nature is 

human nature," that all our feelings are born with us, and as such are 

inherited, that they have been with us for millions of years and that 

we cannot possibly _originate_ any entirely new feeling. True from a 

certain viewpoint. We cannot originate intellect either. The germ of 

intellect with all its potential possibilities was present in our most 

primitive tree-climbing ancestors. But as much difference as there is 

between the intellect of an Australian bushman and the intellect of a 

Spinoza, a Shakespeare, a Darwin, a Victor Hugo, a Goethe or a Gauss, 

so much difference is there between the love of a primitive savage and 

the love of the highly cultured modern man. The love or so-called love 

of the primitive or ignorant man (and woman) is a simple matter and is 

practically equivalent to a desire for sexual gratification. The love 

of the truly cultured and highly civilized man and woman, while still 

_based_ on sexual attraction, is so complex and so dominating a 

feeling that it completely defies all analysis, all attempts at 

dissection, as it defies all attempts at synthesis, at artificial 

building up. 

 

As previously stated, some writers attempt to make a clear distinction 

between sensual and sentimental love; many reams of paper have been 

used up in an endeavor to differentiate between one and the other; the 

first is called animal love or lust; the second pure love or ideal 

love; the first variety of love is said to be selfish, egotistic, the 

other--self-sacrificing, altruistic. These distinctions read very 

nicely, but they mean very little. There is no distinct line of 

demarkation between the two varieties of love, and one merges 

imperceptibly into the other. Most, if not all, of our apparently 

altruistic actions and feelings have an egotistic substratum; and the 

quality of the love depends upon the lover. In other words, there are 

not two separate, distinct varieties of love, but there are separate, 

distinct varieties of men. A fine and noble man will love finely and 

nobly; a coarse and brutal man will love coarsely and brutally. A man 

who is fine and noble may not love at all, but he cannot love coarsely 

and selfishly; and a coarse and brutal man can never love nobly and 

unselfishly. Which once more means: the difference is not inherent in 

the love, but in the lover. 

 

But to say that a man may deeply love a woman and not have any sexual 

desire for her is nonsense. A man who loves a woman and does not want 


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