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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

perfection, physical, mental, and spiritual; nobody can be compared 

with her. And, of course, the man is anxiously eager to marry the 

object of his love--unless insuperable obstacles are in the way; for 

instance, if the man happens to be married. 

 

Infatuation may be as strong as any "being in love" feeling. But with 

this difference. In infatuation the man may know that the object of 

infatuation is an unworthy one, he may despise her, he may hate her, 

he may pray for her death, he may do his utmost to overcome the 

infatuation. In short, infatuation is a feeling, chiefly physical, 

which the man can analyze, the unworthiness and absurdity of which he 

may acknowledge, but which he is unable to resist or overcome. He 

feels himself bewitched; he feels himself caught in a net, he is 

anxious to tear asunder the meshes of the net, but is not strong 

enough to do it. 

 

And this is a pretty good way to differentiate between being in love 

and being infatuated. If in love the man does not want to be free from 

his chains; he does not want to cease to love or to be in love. When 

infatuated the man often uses his utmost will-power to break his 

shackles. Sexual satisfaction is often sufficient to shatter an 

infatuation; it is not sufficient to destroy love--it often 

strengthens and eternalizes it. 

 

Neither being in love nor infatuation can last "forever"; they are 

acute maladies of high tension and relatively short duration. 

Infatuation may change into indifference or disgust; "being in love" 

may change into indifference, hatred, or into real love--a steady, 

durable love. 

 

This will answer the often asked question: How do marriages turn out 

which are the result of a sudden, violent passion, or of love at first 

sight? No ironclad rules suitable for all cases can be given. Some 

turn out very unhappily, the couple gradually finding out that they 

are altogether unsuited to each other, that their temperaments are 

incompatible, that their views, ideas, likes and dislikes are 

different. In some cases what was supposed to be a great love is soon 

seen to have been merely an infatuation. And satiety and disgust 

follow. But in other cases, as mentioned, the sudden consuming passion 

turns into a warm, life-long love and the people live happily ever 

after. 

 

Dr. Nystroem relates the case of a prominent physician of France, of 

high social and scientific standing, who beheld a young girl 

accidentally in the street. He did not have the slightest idea who she 

was. He was irresistibly attracted to her. He followed her, boarded 

the same omnibus and went to the house which she entered, rang the 

bell, introduced himself, begging pardon for his intrusion, but was 

dismissed. He returned and explained to her his ardent passion and 

asked permission to visit her parents, well-to-do people in the 


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