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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

for a human being to love more than one other human being at the same 

time. We must show that the love of the modern educated and esthetic 

man and woman is an exceedingly complex feeling, and that a man may 

deeply and sincerely love one woman for certain qualities and just as 

deeply and sincerely love another woman for certain other qualities. 

Of course, love cannot be measured by the yard or bushel, nor can it 

be weighed on the most delicate chemical balance. And it may be 

impossible to determine whether he loves both women exactly alike or 

he loves one woman more than the other. But that one love does not 

exclude another, that it may even intensify the other love, that is 

certain, and is the opinion of every advanced sexologist. 

 

Max Nordau, a man of high and austere ideals, a man whom nobody will 

accuse of a tendency to licentiousness, says in his Conventional Lies: 

"It may sound very shocking, yet I must say it: we can even love 

_several_ individuals at the same time, with nearly equal tenderness, 

and we do not necessarily lie when we assure each one of our passion. 

No matter how deeply we may be in love with a certain individual, we 

_do not cease_ to be susceptible to the influence of the entire sex." 

 

And Iwan Bloch, than whom no greater investigator in the field of 

sexology ever lived, asks the question: "Is it possible for any one to 

be _simultaneously_ in love with several individuals?" And he 

immediately says: "I answer this question with an unconditional 

'yes.'" And he says further: "It is precisely the extraordinary 

manifold spiritual differentiation of modern civilized humanity that 

gives rise to the possibility of such a simultaneous love for two 

individuals. Our spiritual nature exhibits the most varied coloring. 

It is difficult always to find the corresponding complements in one 

single individual." 

 

Prof. Robert Michels says: "It is Nature's will that the normal male 

should feel a continuous and powerful sexual attraction towards a 

considerable number of women.... In the male the stimuli capable of 

arousing sexual excitement (this term is not to be understood here in 

the grossly physical sense) are so extraordinarily manifold, so widely 

differentiated that it is quite impossible for one single woman to 

possess them all." 

 

Prof. von Ehrenfels wittily remarks that if it were a moral precept 

that a man should never have intercourse _more them once in his life_ 

with any particular woman, this would correspond far better with the 

nature of the normal male and would cost him far less will-power than 

is needed by him in order to live up to the conventional demands of 

monogamy. 

 

And Havelock Ellis cautiously says: "A certain degree of variation is 


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