Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

man has, by accusing his innocent wife of infidelity and by torturing 

her with baseless suspicions, driven her into the arms of a lover. We 

are all more or less susceptible to suggestion, and by continually 

suspecting a wife of a love affair or illicit relation a man may 

implant the seed of suggestion so strongly that it may grow 

luxuriantly and the wife may be unable to resist the suggested 

temptation. And very often the very lover is suggested by the husband. 

"Yes, don't attempt to deny it. It is useless. I know you have 

relations with X. I know you are his mistress." He kept on repeating 

it so often to his absolutely blameless, innocent young wife and he 

made her so wretched by his rudeness and brutality that one day she 

did go over to X's rooms and did become his mistress. And after that 

she could stand her husband's outbursts with equanimity. "If I have 

the name I might as well have the game," is a good bit of psychologic 

wisdom. And a husband should be very careful about even suspecting a 

wife unjustly, and thus make the first step towards rendering his 

baseless suspicions a reality, his unjust accusations justified. And, 

of course, what is true of the husband is also true of the wife. Many 

a wife has driven her indolent husband into the hands of prostitutes 

or mistresses by her incessant nagging, false accusations and vicious 

epithets applied to all his female friends and acquaintances. 

 

Yes, from whatever angle you consider it, jealousy is a mean, nasty, 

miserable feeling. Because it is a more or less universal feeling, 

because "we cannot help it," does not render it less mean, less nasty, 

less miserable. 

 

I do not for a moment imagine that characterizing jealousy the way it 

deserves to be characterized, calling it a shameful, savage, primitive 

feeling, etc., is at once going to banish it from the breasts of men 

and women in which it has found an abiding place; throwing epithets at 

it will not cause it to unfasten its talons. Unfortunately, I know 

only too well that our emotions are stronger than our reason; the man 

or woman at whose poor heart jealousy is gnawing day and night is not 

amenable to reason, is not curable by arguments; all we can do is to 

sympathize with such a person and ask the Lord to pity him or her. 

 

I have known a man who lived with his wife in free union, i.e., he was 

not married to her. He did not believe in marriage. Love was the only 

bond that should bind people together; as soon as love was no more the 

people should separate in a friendly, comradely manner. If the wife or 

the mistress wants another lover, she should be free to take one; she 

is a free human being and not her husband's chattel slave, etc., etc., 


Page 8 from 10:  Back   1   2   3   4   5   6   7  [8]  9   10   Forward