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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

subtle) type, and if she really loves her husband, she will overlook 

his little foibles, peccadilloes and transgressions--and she may live 

quite happily. And the time will come when the husband himself will 

give up his peccadilloes and transgressions and will cleave powerfully 

to his wife, will be bound to her by bonds never to be torn asunder. 

_I know of several such cases._ 

 

And I will take this opportunity to say that I have the deepest 

contempt for the wife who, on finding out that her husband had 

committed a transgression or that he has a love affair, leaves him in 

a huff, or makes a public scandal, or sues for divorce. Such a wife 

_never_ loved her husband, and he is well rid of her. And what I said 

about the wife applies with _almost_ equal force to the husband. 

 

=The Abandoned Lover.= But what shall the abandoned lover do? Let us 

take the case of A and B, and let A stand for any man and B for any 

woman; or, _vice versa_, let A be the woman and B the man, for in 

jealousy and love what applies to one sex is applicable with 

practically the same force to the opposite sex. Suppose A is intensely 

jealous of and deeply, passionately in love with B; but B is utterly 

indifferent and does not care what A may feel or do. A and B may be 

married or not; this does not alter the case materially. Suppose B, if 

unmarried to A, goes off and marries another man, or, if married to 

A, goes off and leaves him; or suppose B does not love anybody else, 

but just remains indifferent to A's advances or repels him because she 

cannot reciprocate his love. Unrequited love alone can cause almost as 

fierce tortures as the most intense jealousy. And A suffers tortures. 

What shall he do? What shall he do to save himself--to save his 

health, his mind, his life? For he is unable to eat, unable to sleep, 

unable to work, and he feels that he is going to pieces. He has lost 

his position and is in danger of losing his reason. What shall he do 

to escape insanity or a suicide's grave? There is but one remedy. Let 

him use all his energies to find a _substitute_. I mean a living 

substitute. Mere sexual desire may be sublimated, to a certain extent, 

into other channels, may be replaced by work, study, a hobby or some 

engrossing interest. A great unrequited love, with the element of 

jealousy present or absent, cannot be replaced by anything else except 

by another love. And where as great a love is impossible let it be a 

minor love or a series of minor loves. When Goethe, one of the world's 

great lovers, was unable to walk in the broad avenue of a great love 

he would walk in the by-paths of a number of little loves. The common 

talk about a person being unable to love more than once in his or her 

life is silly nonsense. A man or a woman is able to love, and love 


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