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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

which fanned his flame all the more. And suddenly he received a note 

asking him not to call any more, nor to try to communicate in any 

other way. He did write, but his letters were returned unopened. And 

soon after he read of her engagement to a prominent young banker. He 

nearly went insane, and this is used not in any figurative sense. His 

insomnia was _complete_, and resisted all treatment. When his pulse 

became very rapid and his eyes acquired the wild look that they do 

after many sleepless nights an attempt was made to administer 

hypnotics, but they had practically no effect. Chloral, veronal, etc., 

only made him "dopy," irritable and depressed, but did not give him 

one hour of sound sleep. His appetite was gone, now and then his limbs 

would twitch, and he would sit and stare into space for hours at a 

time. To study or attend the clinics was out of the question, and he 

did not even attempt to take the final examinations. The parents felt 

distressed, but were unable to do anything for him. The least attempt 

at interference on their part, any attempt to console him, to induce 

him to pull himself together, made him more irritable, more morose; so 

that they finally left him alone. He was practically a total 

abstainer, but one evening he went out and came home drunk; and after 

that he drank frequently and heavily. His parents could do nothing 

with him. One evening on Broadway he was accosted by a young 

street-walker. She had a pleasant, sympathetic face, and he went with 

her. _That was his first sex experience._ Up to that time he was 

chaste. He met her again the following evening. Gradually a sort of 

friendship grew up between them. She found out the cause of his grief, 

and with maternal solicitude she tried everything in her power to 

console him, and he began to look forward to the nightly meeting with 

her. His grief became gradually less acute, he gave up drinking, which 

he disliked, and which he had taken up only to deaden his pain; he 

began to pull himself together, and in six or eight months he took 

over his last year in Columbia and was properly graduated. He kept up 

the friendship with the girl for over two years, when she died of 

pneumonia. He did not love her, but he liked to be with her, as her 

presence gave him physical and mental comfort. It is possible that she 

loved him genuinely, but there was never any sentimental talk between 

them, and there was never any question between them of the permanency 

of the relationship. They both knew that it was temporary. But he is 

absolutely certain that but for one of the representatives of the 

class that is despised, driven about and persecuted by brutal 

policemen and ignorant judges, he would have become a bum, or, most 

likely, he would have committed suicide--at the point of which he was 


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