Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

several times; only pity for his mother and sisters restrained him. 

 

And here is another case. A girl about twenty-eight years of age fell 

in love with a man four or five years her senior. The love seemed to 

be reciprocated, and they soon became engaged to be married. He asked 

that the engagement, on account of certain business reasons, be kept 

secret. She did not know the man well; she had met him at several 

entertainments and church affairs and he seemed very nice. He always 

found some excuses for delaying the marriage, and after they had been 

engaged about a year he began to insist on sex relations. Though of a 

refined and noble character, she was of a passionate nature and she 

did not offer much resistance. Many girls who would under no 

circumstance indulge in illicit relations, considering it a great sin, 

have no compunctions about having relations with their fiances. They 

lived together for about a year. They were together almost daily, 

except now and then, when he would go away for a week or two on 

business. Once he went away--and never came back. He wrote to her that 

their relations were at an end; that he was a married man and a 

father of children; he had hoped he might get a divorce, but that now 

he had changed his mind and that she must forget him, etc. Everything 

was black before her. It cost her a supreme effort not to faint, and 

she was supported in this effort by the fact that when the letter came 

she was in the presence of friends; a terrible, overpowering, 

all-inundating sense of shame gave her the strength not to betray her 

condition and her story before the world at large. But as soon as she 

was alone she collapsed completely. There was the most absolute 

insomnia imaginable, complete anorexia, but the most distressing 

features were frequent fainting spells, severe palpitation of the 

heart and tremors. She had no love for the man--so she said. Her love 

had turned to hatred and contempt--but the jealousy was all-consuming. 

Like a fire it was burning in her, searing her brain and her soul day 

and night. 

 

She felt that she was not strong enough to stand this physical and 

mental torture, and so she decided to commit suicide. As the means she 

selected gas. Fortunately, the smell became perceptible before the 

injury was irreparable. She was saved. But she felt that she could not 

stand the torture very long--and more than anything was she afraid 

that her mind would give way. She had a special horror of insanity. 

And so she decided to make another attempt This time with bichloride. 

Again she was saved. A friend of hers then got an inkling of the 

events that were transpiring, and she introduced her to some gentlemen 

friends. They were nice people and more or less radical on the sex 


Page 6 from 8:  Back   1   2   3   4   5  [6]  7   8   Forward