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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

question. In order to drown her pain she began to go out very 

frequently with that crowd, and to her surprise and delight she found 

that she soon began to think less and less about her contemptible 

seducer, and, what was more important to her, she was soon able to 

sleep. For about six months she led an extremely active, almost 

promiscuous sex life. But then she gave it up, as she felt herself 

normal and no longer in need of it. She is now happily married. 

 

I am through with this rather lengthy essay on one of the most painful 

manifestations of human emotional life. I repeat that I am aware that 

feelings are often stronger than reason; but saying this does not mean 

asserting that feelings cannot be modified and held in check by 

reason. And I feel confident that a careful, open-minded reading of 

these pages and an acceptance of the ideas therein promulgated would 

aid in _preventing_ a good deal of the misery of jealousy and in 

curing a certain proportion of it after it has found lodgment in the 

hearts of unhappy men and women. 

 

There are one or two more points that might be touched upon, but with 

the freedom of press in reference to sex matters as it exists in this 

country to-day, I have said all that I could say. 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER FIFTY-THREE 

 

CONCLUDING WORDS 

 

 

It is my sincere belief--and I cherish the belief in spite of this 

horrible, wretched war which seems to be shattering the very 

foundations of everything that we hold dear, destroying all the humane 

and moral achievements that have been laboriously built up in the 

course of many centuries--that the time will come when the world will 

be practically free from pain and suffering. Almost all disease will 

be conquered, accidents will be rare, the fear of starvation or 

poverty or unemployment will no longer haunt men and women, every 

infant born will be well-born and welcome, and the numerous anxieties 

and ambitions that now disturb the lives of so many of the earth's 

inhabitants will no longer plague us. They will be the dead memories 

of a dead and forgotten past. 

 

Yes, I believe that the time will come when the world will be 

practically free from pain and suffering. But there is one exception. 

I do not believe that we will ever be able entirely to eliminate the 

_tragedies of the heart_. For our physical ills, which will be few in 

number, there will be a socialized medical profession; everywhere 

there will be free hospitals and convalescent homes. The unemployment 

problem will be dealt with by the State, and dealt with so that there 

will be no unemployment problem. There will be work for everybody and 

everybody will do the work which he finds most congenial. But the 

State, I fear, will be able to do nothing in affairs of the heart. 


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