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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

 

You see the importance of the internal ovarian secretion, and you will 

readily understand why, when the ovaries are removed by operation, the 

woman, particularly if she is young, undergoes such marked changes. It 

is because we recognize now the great importance of the ovaries that 

we always, when operating on diseased ovaries leave at least a small 

piece of ovary, if at all possible. 

 

=Number of Ova.= When the female infant is born, her ovaries contain 

as many ova or eggs as they ever will contain. In fact, they contain 

more than they will at puberty. For it is estimated that at birth each 

ovary contains about 100,000 ova; the majority of these, however, 

disappear so that at the age of puberty each ovary contains only about 

30,000 ova. As only one ovum ripens each month from the time of 

puberty to the time of the menopause (i.e., about 300 to 400 ova at 

the utmost during a lifetime), and as only a dozen or two ova would 

be necessary for the propagation of the race, it seems a 

superabundance of ova, an unnecessary lavishness. But nature _is_ 

lavish where the propagation of the species is concerned. A portion of 

an ovary or of both ovaries might become diseased, and thousands of 

ova might become unfit for fertilization; nature therefore puts in an 

extra reserve supply. We see a still more striking example of this 

extreme extravagant lavishness in man; only one spermatozooen is 

necessary to impregnate the ovum, and only one spermatozooen can 

penetrate the ovum; nevertheless each normal ejaculation of semen 

contains between a quarter and half a million spermatozoa. 

 

=The Graafian Follicles.= Each primitive or primordial ovum[3] is 

imbedded in a little vesicle or follicle, which is generally known as 

_Graafian follicle_, and there are as many Graafian follicles as there 

are ova. (The Graafian follicles were first described about 250 years 

ago--in 1672--by a Delft physician named De Graaf, hence the name.) 

Until puberty, that is the commencement of menstruation, the Graafian 

follicles with the ooecytes or primitive ova are in a more or less 

dormant condition. But with the onset of puberty there commences a 

period of intense activity in the ovaries. This period of activity is 

repeated regularly once a month, and it constitutes the process of 

_ovulation_ and _menstruation_. The two processes are closely though 

not causally connected. Ovulation consists in the monthly maturation 

and extrusion of a ripe ovum; menstruation, which will be further 

discussed in a separate chapter, consists in the monthly discharge of 

blood, mixed with mucus from the inside lining of the uterus. Every 

twenty-eight days, from the time of puberty to the time of the 

menopause, a Graafian follicle bursts and an ovum is extruded from the 


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