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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

the lot of millions of women, and from which men are entirely free, is 

called _dysmenorrhea_. Dysmenorrhea means painful and difficult 

menstruation. A slight pain or at least a feeling of discomfort is 

present in most cases of menstruation. But in many cases the pain is 

so severe, so _excruciating_, that the sufferer, girl or woman, is 

incapacitated for any work, and must go to bed for a day or two. In 

some cases the pain is so severe as to necessitate the use of 

morphine, and as it is a very bad thing to have to give morphine every 

three or four weeks, every endeavor should be made to find out the 

cause of the trouble and to remove it. It is a mistake, however, to 

think that all or even most cases of dysmenorrhea are due to some 

local trouble, that is, to an inflammation of the ovaries, or a 

displacement of the womb. Many cases of dysmenorrhea are of _nervous_ 

origin; the cause resides in the central nervous system, and not in 

the genital organs themselves. It is, therefore, not advisable to 

undertake any local treatment, unless a competent physician has made a 

thorough examination and has decided that local treatment is 

advisable. 

 

As to the percentage of dysmenorrhea, a recent statistical examination 

of 4,000 women showed that dysmenorrhea of some degree was present in 

over one-half, namely, 52 per cent. 

 

 


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