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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

forms of no importance, and of course no human beings. 

 

=Fecundation= or fertilization is the process of union of the female 

germ cell with the male germ cell; speaking of animals, it is the 

process of union of the egg or ovum of the female with the 

spermatozooen of the male. When a successful union of these two cells 

takes place a new being is started. The process of fertilization or 

fecundation is also known as impregnation and conception. We say, to 

fertilize (chiefly, however, when speaking of plants) or to fecundate 

an ovum, or to impregnate a female or woman, and to conceive a child. 

We say the woman has become impregnated or has conceived. 

 

_The Process._ The process of fecundation is briefly as follows. An 

ovum becomes mature, breaks through its Graafian follicle in the ovary 

and is set free. It is caught by the fimbriated or trumpet-shaped 

extremity of the Fallopian tube and, moved by the wave-like motion of 

the cilia[4] of the lining of the tube, it begins its travel towards 

the uterus. If no sexual intercourse has taken place nothing happens. 

The ovum dries up, or "dies," and either remains somewhere in the tube 

or womb or is removed from the latter with the menstruation, or mucous 

discharge. But if intercourse has taken place, thousands and thousands 

of the male germ cells or spermatozoa enter the uterus through its 

opening or external os, and begin to travel upward in search of the 

ovum. The spermatozoa are capable of independent motion, and they 

travel pretty fast. It is claimed that they can travel an inch in 

seven minutes, which is pretty fast when you take into consideration 

that a spermatozooen is only 1/300 of an inch long. Many of the 

spermatozoa, weaker than the others, perish on the way, and only a few 

continue the journey up through the uterus to the tube. When near the 

little ovum, which remains passive, their movements become more and 

more rapid, they seem to be attracted to it as if by a magnet, and 

finally one spermatozooen--just one--the one that happens to be the 

strongest or the nearest, makes a mad rush at it with its head, 

perforates it, and is completely swallowed up by it. As soon as the 

spermatozooen has been absorbed by the ovum, the opening through which 

it got in becomes tightly sealed up--a coagulation takes place near 

it--so that no other spermatozoa can enter the ovum. For if two or 

more spermatozoa got into the same ovum a monstrosity would be apt to 

be the result. 

 

[Illustration: SPERMATOZOOeN PENETRATING THE OVUM.] 

 

What becomes of all the other spermatozoa? They perish. Only one is 

needed. But in the ovum that has been impregnated, and which is now 

called an embryo, a feverish activity commences. First of all it looks 


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