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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

for a fixed place of abode. If the ovum happened to be in the uterus 

when the spermatozooen met and entered it, it remains there. It becomes 

attached to some spot in the lining of the womb and there it grows and 

develops, until at the end of nine months it has reached its full 

growth, and the womb opens and it comes out into the outside world. If 

the ovum is in the Fallopian tube when the spermatozooen meets it, as 

is usually the case, it travels down to the uterus, and fixes itself 

there. 

 

=Extra-Uterine Pregnancy.= The tube is a bad place for the ovum to 

grow and develop, because the tube cannot stretch to such an extent as 

the uterus can, nor can it furnish the embryo such good nourishment as 

the uterus can. Occasionally, however, it happens that the impregnated 

ovum remains in the tube and develops there; we then have a case of 

what we call _extra-uterine_ (outside-of-the-uterus) or _tubal_ 

pregnancy. Extra-uterine pregnancy is also called _ectopic_ pregnancy, 

or ectopic gestation. Unless diagnosed early and operated upon, the 

woman may be in great danger, for after a few weeks or months the tube 

generally ruptures. 

 

From the moment the spermatozooen has entered the ovum, a process of 

_division_ or _segmentation_ commences. The ovum, which consists of 

one cell, divides into two, the two into four, the four into eight, 

the eight into sixteen, these into thirty-two, these into sixty-four, 

128, 256, 512, 1,024, until they can no longer be counted. This 

mulberry mass of cells arranges itself into two layers, with a cavity 

in between. And from these layers of cells there develop gradually all 

organs and tissues, until a fully formed and perfect child is the 

result. If two ova are impregnated at the same time by two 

spermatozoa, the result is twins.[5] 

 

I might mention here that the moment the ovum is impregnated, i.e., 

joined by a spermatozooen, it is called technically a zygote; it is 

also called embryo, and this name is applied to it until the age of 

five or six weeks. Some use the term embryo up to two or three months. 

After that, until it is born, it is called fetus. 

 

A study of the development of the embryo and the formation of the 

various organs from one single cell, the ovum, vitalized or fecundated 

by another single cell, the spermatozooen, is the most wonderful and 

most fascinating of all studies. But that belongs to the domain of 

Embryology, which is a separate science. 

 

What we see in the process of fecundation is a foreshadowing of the 

future man and woman. The ovum has no motion of its own, it is moved 

along by the wave-like motions of the lining cells of the Fallopian 

tube, and throughout the entire act it remains passive. The 

spermatozooen, on the other hand, is in a state of continuous activity 


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