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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

vomits almost incessantly, and may become very much run down and 

exhausted. The vomited matter may contain blood. For this condition a 

competent physician must be consulted, for in some cases the patient's 

life may be in danger and an abortion has to be performed. 

 

=Capricious Appetite.= A capricious appetite is very common in 

pregnancy. The capriciousness may express itself in four different 

directions: (1) The patient may lose her appetite, almost altogether, 

partaking only of very little food, and that with effort. This 

condition of loss of appetite is called anorexia. (2) The patient may 

develop an enormous appetite--what we call bulimia--eating several 

times as much as she does ordinarily. (3) She may develop an aversion 

towards certain articles of food. Thus many women develop an aversion 

towards meat, the mere sight of or talk about meat causing in them a 

sensation of nausea. (4) She may show a craving for the most peculiar 

articles of food and for articles which are not food at all. The 

craving for sour pickles or sour cabbage is well-known; but some women 

will eat chalk, sand, and even more peculiar things (for the chalk 

there may be a reason: the system needs an extra amount of lime and 

chalk is carbonate of lime). 

 

=Constipation.= Constipation is very common among women in the 

non-pregnant condition; but in the pregnant it is much more common and 

much more aggravated. Constipation must be guarded against, but the 

measures must be of a mild nature. If we can relieve the constipation 

by dietary measures alone, so much the better. The dietary measures 

should consist in eating plenty of fruit--prunes, apples, figs, dates, 

etc., and coarse bread and bran. Constipating articles, such as cheese 

or coffee, should be eliminated. Where dietary measures alone are 

insufficient, the patient should take an enema--a rectal 

injection--twice or three times a week. The enema should consist of 

about 8 ounces (half a pint) of cold or lukewarm water containing a 

pinch of salt, and should be retained about ten minutes. Instead of 

water, we may advise an occasional enema of two to four drams of 

glycerin. Or instead of a glycerin enema, a glycerin suppository may 

be used. If internal laxatives are to be used, only the mildest and 

non-griping preparations should be employed The best are: a good 

mineral oil--one or two tablespoonfuls on going to bed, or fluid 

extract of cascara sagrada, one-half to one teaspoonful on going to 

bed. It is very important, whatever we use, _not_ to use the same 

thing for a long time. If the same drug or measure is used without any 

change, the bowels get used to it and cease to respond and we have to 

use larger and larger doses. In fighting constipation we must 

therefore constantly change our weapons: one night we use mineral oil, 


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