Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

CHAPTER TWELVE 

 

WHEN TO ENGAGE A PHYSICIAN 

 

Necessity for the Pregnant Woman Immediately Placing Herself Under 

Care of Physician and Remaining Under His Care During Entire 

Period. 

 

 

The disorders and disturbances described above are, with the exception 

of pernicious vomiting, of a minor nature. They are annoying, may 

cause considerable discomfort and suffering, but they do not endanger 

the life of the woman or of the child. Occasionally, however, 

fortunately not very often, the kidneys become affected, and for this 

condition treatment by a physician is absolutely necessary. In fact, 

the correct and safe thing for a woman to do is to consult a physician 

as soon as she knows she is pregnant, and have him take care of her 

during the entire pregnancy. Some women engage a physician during the 

eighth or ninth month and this is decidedly wrong, because it may then 

be too late to correct certain troubles which if taken at the outset 

could have been easily cured; while many troubles in the hands of a 

competent physician can be prevented altogether. I must therefore 

reiterate: every woman should engage a physician from the beginning 

of her pregnancy, or at least during the third or fourth and certainly 

not later than the fifth month. He will examine the urine every month 

and make sure that the kidneys are in order, he will make sure that 

the child is in a normal position, and will prevent a host of other 

ills. 

 

[Illustration: POSITION OF THE CHILD IN THE WOMB.] 

 

This is not a special treatise on the management of pregnancy, and 

therefore minute details are out of place. Besides, to the details the 

physician will attend. But some hints regarding diet and general 

hygiene will prove useful. 

 

If everything is satisfactory, if there is no severe vomiting, kidney 

trouble, etc., the usual mixed diet may continue. The only changes I 

would make are the following: Drink plenty of hot water during entire 

course of pregnancy: a glass or two in the morning, two or three 

glasses in the afternoon, the same at night. From six to twelve 

glasses may be consumed. Also plenty of milk, buttermilk and fermented 

milk. Plenty of fruit and vegetables. Meat only once a day. For the 

tendency to constipation, whole wheat bread, rye bread, bread baked of 

bran or bran with cream. 

 

As to exercise, either extreme must be avoided. Some women think that 

as soon as they become pregnant, they must not move a muscle; they are 

to be put in a glass case, and kept there to the day of delivery. 

Other women, on the other hand, of the ultramodern type, indulge in 

strenuous exercise and go out on long fatiguing walks up to the last 

day. Either extreme is injurious. The right way is moderate exercise, 

and short, non-fatiguing walks. 

 

Bathing may be kept up to the day of delivery. But warm baths, 


Page 1 from 6: [1]  2   3   4   5   6   Forward