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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

particularly during the last two or three months, are preferable to 

cold baths. 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER THIRTEEN 

 

THE SIZE OF THE FETUS 

 

Approximately Correct Measurements and Weight of Fetus at End of 

Each Month of Pregnancy. 

 

 

Men and women are always interested to know how large the fetus is and 

how far it is developed during the various months of pregnancy. 

Absolutely exact measurements cannot be given, but the following 

approximate measurements are correct: 

 

[Illustration: 1. EMBRYO BETWEEN ONE AND TWO WEEKS OLD. 

2. EMBRYO ABOUT FOUR WEEKS OLD. 

3. EMBRYO ABOUT SIX WEEKS OLD. 

(Illustrations are double the actual size.)] 

 

At the end of the first month (lunar) it is about the size of a 

hazelnut. Weighs about 15 grains. 

 

At the end of the second month it is the size of a small hen's egg. 

The internal organs are partially formed, it begins to assume a human 

shape, but the sex cannot yet be differentiated. Up to the fifth or 

sixth week it does not differ much in appearance from the embryos of 

other animals. 

 

At the end of the third month it is the size of a large goose egg; it 

is about two to three and a half inches long. Weighs about one ounce. 

 

At the end of the fourth month the fetus is between six and seven 

inches long and weighs about five ounces. 

 

At the end of the fifth month the fetus is between seven and eleven 

inches long, and weighs eight to ten ounces. 

 

At the end of the sixth month it is eleven to thirteen inches long and 

weighs one and one-half to two pounds. If born, is capable of living a 

few minutes, and it is reported that some six months' children have 

been incubated. 

 

At the end of the seventh month the fetus is from thirteen to fifteen 

or sixteen inches long and weighs about three pounds. Is capable of 

independent life, but must be brought up with great care, usually in 

an incubator. 

 

At the end of the eighth month the length is from fifteen to 

seventeen inches, and weight from three to five pounds. 

 

At the end of the ninth month the length of the fetus is from sixteen 

to seventeen and one-half inches, and weight from five to seven 

pounds. 

 

At the end of the tenth lunar month (at birth) the length of the child 

is from seventeen to nineteen inches and the weight from six to twelve 

pounds; the average is seven and a quarter, but there are full term 

children weighing less than six pounds and more than twelve; but these 

are exceptions. 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER FOURTEEN 

 

THE AFTERBIRTH (PLACENTA) AND CORD 

 

How the Afterbirth Develops--Bag of Waters--Umbilical Cord--The 

Navel--Fetus Nourished by Absorption--Fetus Breathes by Aid of 

Placenta--No Nervous Connection Between Mother and Child. 

 

 

Whatever part of the womb the ovum attaches itself to is stimulated to 


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