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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

intense activity, to growth. Numerous bloodvessels begin to grow and 

that part of the lining membrane with its numerous bloodvessels 

constitute the placenta, or as it is commonly called _afterbirth_, 

because it comes out _after_ the _birth_ of the child. From the 

placenta there is also reflected a membrane over the ovum, so as to 

give it additional protection. That membrane forms a complete bag over 

the fetus; this bag becomes filled with liquid, so that the fetus 

floats freely in a bag of waters; this bag bursts only during 

childbirth. The fetus is not attached close to the placenta, but is, 

so to say, suspended from it by a _cord_, which is called the 

_umbilical cord_. When the child is born, the umbilical cord is cut, 

and the scar or depression in the abdomen where the umbilical cord 

was attached constitutes the navel or umbilicus (in slang 

language--button or belly button). The umbilical cord consists of two 

arteries and one vein embedded in a gelatin like substance and 

enveloped by a membrane, and it is through the umbilical cord that the 

blood from the placenta is brought to and carried from the fetus. The 

blood of the fetus and the blood of the mother do not mix; the 

bloodvessels are separated by thin walls, and it is through these thin 

walls that the fetal blood receives the ingredients it needs from the 

mother's blood. In other words, it receives its nourishment from the 

mother by _absorption_ or _osmosis_. The blood from the placenta also 

furnishes the fetal blood with oxygen, so that the fetus breathes by 

the aid of the placenta, and not through its own lungs. 

 

It is well to remember that there is absolutely no nervous connection 

between mother and child. There are no nerves whatever in the 

umbilical cord, so that the nervous systems of the fetus and of the 

mother are entirely distinct and separate. And this will explain why 

certain nervous impressions and shocks received by the mother are not 

readily transmitted to the child. It is only through changes in the 

mother's blood that the fetus can be influenced. As will be seen in a 

later chapter we are skeptical about "maternal impressions." 

 

 

 

 

CHAPTER FIFTEEN 

 

LACTATION OR NURSING 

 

No Perfect Substitute for Mother's Milk--When Nursing is Injurious 

to Mother and Child--Modified Milk--Artificial Foods--Care 

Essential in Selecting Wet Nurse--Suckling Child Benefits 

Mother--Reciprocal Affection Strengthened by Nursing--Sexual 

Feelings While Nursing--Alcoholics are Injurious--Attention to 

Condition of Nipples During Pregnancy Essential--Treatment of 

Sunken Nipples--Treatment of Tender Nipples--Treatment of Cracked 

Nipples--How to Stop the Secretion of Milk When Necessary-- 

Menstruation While Nursing--Pregnancy in the Nursing Woman. 


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