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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

 

 

Every mother should nurse her child--if she can. There is no perfect 

substitute for mother's milk. There is only one excuse for a mother 

not nursing--that is when she has no milk, or when the quality of the 

milk is so poor that the child does not thrive on it, or when the 

mother is run down, is threatened with or is suffering with 

tuberculosis, etc. In such cases the nursing would prove injurious to 

both mother and child. 

 

When the mother cannot nurse the child, it should be brought up 

artificially on modified cow's milk. Formulas for modified milk have 

been worked out for every month of the child's life, and if the 

formulas are carefully followed, and the bottle and nipples are 

properly sterilized, the child should have no trouble, but should 

thrive and grow like on good mother's milk. If the child is sickly or 

delicate and does not thrive on modified cow's milk or on the other 

artificial foods, such as Horlick's malted milk, or Nestle's food, 

then a wet nurse may become necessary. But before engaging a wet nurse 

great care should be taken to make sure that she is healthy, that the 

age of her child is approximately the same as the age of the child 

which she is about to nurse, and particularly that she is free from 

any syphilitic taint. One, two or more Wassermann tests should be made 

to settle the question definitely. 

 

Mothers should bear in mind that suckling the child is good not only 

for the child, but for the mother as well. Lactation helps the 

_involution_ of the uterus: the uterus of a nursing mother returns 

more quickly and more perfectly to its normal ante-pregnant condition 

than the uterus of the mother who cannot or will not nurse her child. 

 

It is asserted that the reciprocal affection between mother and child 

is greater in cases in which the child suckled its mother's breast. 

This is quite likely. It is also asserted that the nursing mother 

transmits certain traits to its child, which the non-nursing mother 

cannot. This is merely a hypothesis without any scientific proof. 

 

On the other hand, the statement that many women experience decidedly 

pleasurable sexual feelings while nursing seems to be well 

substantiated. 

 

That the mother who nurses her child should partake of sufficient 

nourishment goes without saying. But the advice often given to nursing 

mothers to partake of beer, ale or wine is a bad one. It is a question 

if a mother partaking of considerable quantities of alcoholic 

beverages may not transmit the taste for alcohol to her children. No, 

alcoholics should be left alone, but milk, eggs, meat, fruit and 

vegetables should be partaken of in abundance. 

 

=Preparing the Nipples.= For the infant to be able to nurse properly 

the nipples of the breast must be in good condition. If the nipples 


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