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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

instead of the prominence of the nipple there being a deep depression, 

it becomes necessary to stop the secretion of the milk, or as it is 

said in common parlance, "to dry up the breasts." In former days, not 

so very long ago, and the practice is still common enough to call 

attention to it and to condemn it, the breasts used to be tightly 

bandaged, or they used to be pumped every few hours. The first causes 

unnecessary pain and trouble, while the second procedure, the pumping, 

does exactly the reverse to what it is intended to do. Instead of 

drying up the breasts it keeps up the secretion. The best thing to do 

in a case like that is to leave the breasts alone, not to pump them, 

but just gently support them with a bandage and then in three or four 

days the secretion of the milk will gradually disappear. There is some 

discomfort the first twenty-four or forty-eight hours, but if left 

alone the discomfort is less than if the breasts are manipulated, 

bandaged or pumped. 

 

=Menstruation or Pregnancy While Nursing.= Many women do not 

menstruate and do not become pregnant while they are nursing. Some 

women will not conceive, no matter how long they may nurse the 

child--a year or two or longer. And some women take advantage of this 

fact, and in order to avoid another child they will keep up the 

nursing as long as possible. In Egypt and other Oriental countries 

where our means for the prevention of conception are unknown, it is no 

rare sight to see a child three or four years old interrupting his 

work or his play and running up to suckle his mother's breast. But not 

all women have this good luck. Some women (about fifty per cent.) 

begin to menstruate in the sixth month of lactation, while some become 

pregnant even before they begin to menstruate. It only too often 

happens that a woman considering lactation her safeguard omits to use 

any precautions and finds herself, to her great discomfiture, in a 

pregnant condition. 

 

When a nursing woman discovers that she is pregnant she should give up 

nursing at once. The milk is apt to become of poor quality, but even 

where this is not the case, it is too much for a woman to feed one 

child in the uterus and one at the breast. 

 


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