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Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

CHAPTER EIGHTEEN 

 

THE MENOPAUSE OR CHANGE OF LIFE 

 

Time of Menopause--Cause of Suffering During Menopause-- 

Reproductive Function and Sexual Function Not Synonymous-- 

Increased Libido During Menopause--Change of Life in Men. 

 

 

In the chapter on menstruation I referred briefly to the menopause. I 

will consider it here somewhat more in detail. 

 

The menopause, also called the climacteric, and in common language 

"change of life," is the period at which woman ceases to menstruate. 

The average age at which this occurs is about forty-eight. But while 

some women continue to menstruate up to the age of fifty, fifty-two, 

and even fifty-five, others cease to menstruate at the age of 

forty-five or even forty-two. Between forty-four and fifty-two are the 

normal limits. Anything before or beyond that is exceptional. 

 

Just as the beginning of menstruation may set in without any trouble 

of any kind, and just as some women have not the slightest unpleasant 

symptoms during the entire period of their menstrual life, so the 

menopause occurs in some women without any trouble, physical or 

psychic. The periods between the menses become perhaps a little 

longer, or a little irregular, the menstrual flow becomes more and 

more scanty, then one or several periods may be skipped altogether, 

and the menopause is permanently established. Many women, however, the 

majority probably, suffer considerably during the transitional year or 

years of the menopause. Symptoms are both of a physical and of a 

psychic character, but the psychic symptoms predominate. There may be 

headache, capricious appetite, or complete loss of appetite, 

considerable loss of flesh, or on the contrary very sudden and rapid 

putting on of fat, great irritability, insomnia, profuse perspiration; 

hot flashes throughout the body, and particularly in the face, which 

make the face "blushing" and congested, are particularly frequent. 

Then the woman's character may be completely changed. From gentle and 

submissive she may become pugnacious and quarrelsome. Jealousy without 

any grounds for it may be one of the disagreeable symptoms, making 

both the wife and the husband very unhappy. In some exceptional cases 

a genuine neurosis or psychosis may develop. 

 

=Cause of Suffering During Menopause.= It is my conviction, and I have 

had this conviction for many years, that many, if not most, of the 

distressing symptoms of the menopause are due, not to the menopause 

itself, but to the wrong ideas about this period that have prevailed 

for so many centuries. We know the influence of the mind over the 

body, and the pernicious effect which wrong ideas may exercise over 

our feelings. The generally prevalent opinion among women, and men for 

that matter, and not only of the laity but unfortunately of the 


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