Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
PREFACE
CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4-5-6-7
CHAPTER-8-9
CHAPTER-10-11
CHAPTER-12-13-14-15
CHAPTER-16-17
CHAPTER-18-19
CHAPTER-20-21-22
CHAPTER-23-24-25
CHAPTER-26-27-28
CHAPTER-29-30
CHAPTER-31.1
CHAPTER-31.2
CHAPTER-31.3
CHAPTER-32
CHAPTER-33
CHAPTER-34-35-36-37-38
CHAPTER-39-40-41-42
CHAPTER-43-44-45
CHAPTER-46-47
CHAPTER-48
CHAPTER-49-50
CHAPTER-51
CHAPTER-52-53
The Sex Life of the Gods. Michael Knerr. CHAPTER-1-2
CHAPTER-3
CHAPTER-4
CHAPTER-5-6
CHAPTER-7-8
CHAPTER-9-10
CHAPTER-11-12
CHAPTER-13-14
CHAPTER-15-16
CHAPTER-17-18

 

Often the scolding and the exposure of the child are done in the 

presence of others. This implants in the poor girl a sullen resentment 

that only makes it more difficult for it to break the habit. When the 

child is brought to the physician, you can see by its behavior, by its 

downcast looks, by its sulkiness, by its attempt to refrain from 

tears, and other signs, that it regards the physician in exactly the 

same light as a youthful criminal regards the judge before whom he has 

been brought for trial. 

 

It is time, high time, that this silly and injurious attitude toward a 

practice, which is very common, be radically changed. It is time that 

parents and physicians learn that the injuriousness of the habit has 

been greatly, grossly exaggerated. It is time that they know that the 

vast majority of boys and girls get over the habit without being much, 

or any, the worse for it. The knowledge of this fact will not only 

save them and the children much needless anguish and suffering, but 

will make it much easier to deal with the latter, make it much easier 

to get them divorced from the habit. 

 

If we look at the matter in a sensible, common-sense way, and do not 

tell the child caught in the practice that it has done something 

disgracefully vicious and criminal, but speak to it kindly and tell it 

that it is doing something that may injure it greatly, that may 

interfere with its future mental and physical health and development, 

then we shall have far greater success in our endeavors to break the 

boy or the girl of the habit of masturbation. As I have said in 

another place: 

 

"In my opinion, stigmatizing even the most moderate indulgence in 

masturbation as a vice has a deleterious effect upon the people who so 

indulge and makes it harder for them to break off the habit. Every 

thinking physician and sexologist can tell you that picturing the 

masturbatory habit in too lurid colors and stigmatizing it with too 

strong epithets has, as a rule, the contrary effect to the one 

expected. The victims of the habit consider themselves degraded, 

irretrievably lost. They lose their self-respect, and it is, on 

account of that, harder for them to break themselves of the habit." 

 

We shall accomplish a good deal more with our youthful and older 

patients if we leave alone, altogether, the moral side of the 

question--if there be any moral side to it--and emphasize the physical 

injuriousness of the habit. We do not want to diminish the 

self-respect of our boys and girls, we want to increase it; and we can 

not do this if we make them believe that a masturbator is a vicious 

criminal. Inspire your patients with confidence, tell them that 

indulgence in the habit jeopardizes their future growth, both physical 

and mental, their health and happiness, and you will find them easier 


Page 5 from 7:  Back   1   2   3   4  [5]  6   7   Forward